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Given some code:

keyword=re.findall(r'ke\w+ = \S+',s)
score=re.findall(r'sc\w+ = \S+',s)
print '%s,%s' %(keyword,score)

The output of above code is:

['keyword = NORTH', 'keyword = GUESS', 'keyword = DRESSES', 'keyword = RALPH', 'keyword = MATERIAL'],['score = 88466', 'score = 83965', 'score = 79379', 'score = 74897', 'score = 68168']

But I want the format should be different lines like:

NORTH,88466
GUESS,83935
DRESSES,83935
RALPH,73379
MATERIAL,68168
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3 Answers

Instead of the last line, do this instead:

>>> for k, s in zip(keyword, score):
        kw = k.partition('=')[2].strip()
        sc = s.partition('=')[2].strip()
        print '%s,%s' % (kw, sc)


NORTH,88466
GUESS,83965
DRESSES,79379
RALPH,74897
MATERIAL,68168

Here is how it works:

  • The zip brings the corresponding elements together pairwise.

  • The partition splits a string like 'keyword = NORTH' into three parts (the part before the equal sign, the equal sign itself, and the part after. The [2] keeps only the latter part.

  • The strip removes leading and trailing whitespace.

Alternatively, you can modify your regexes to do much of the work for you by using groups to capture the keywords and scores without the surrounding text:

keywords = re.findall(r'ke\w+ = (\S+)',s)
scores = re.findall(r'sc\w+ = (\S+)',s)
for keyword, score in zip(keywords, scores):
    print '%s,%s' %(keyword,score)
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2  
Nice. strip() isn't necessary if you partition() on ' = ' :-) –  Johnsyweb Nov 27 '11 at 9:06
    
BTW if I use a split() instead of partition() here, would there be any difference besides not having the separator in result? –  Kos Nov 27 '11 at 9:53
2  
For your particular data, no. partition is often easier to work with in situations where the separator might be absent or appear multiple times, since you'll always get a 3-item list where split might throw an exception or give you multiple items. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 27 '11 at 10:16
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Hope this will help:

keyword = ['NORTH','GUESS','DERESSES','RALPH']
score = [88466,83935,83935,73379]

for key,value in zip(keyword,score):
  print "%s,%s" %(key,value)
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One way would be like would be to zip() the two lists together (to iterate over them pairwise) and use str.partition() to grab the data after the =, like this::

def after_equals(s):
    return s.partition(' = ')[-1]

for k,s in zip(keyword, score):
    print after_equals(k) + ',' + after_equals(s)

If you don't want to call after_equals() twice, you could refactor to:

for pair in zip(keyword, score):
    print ','.join(after_equals(data) for data in pair)

If you want to write to a text file (you really should have mentioned this in the question, not in your comments on my answer), then you can take this approach...

with open('output.txt', 'w+') as output:
    for pair in zip(keyword, score):
        output.write(','.join(after_equals(data) for data in pair) + '\n')

Output:

% cat output.txt
NORTH,88466
GUESS,83965
DRESSES,79379
RALPH,74897
MATERIAL,68168
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How to write output to a file, FILE.writelines ','.join(after_equals(data) for data in pair) –  newcane Nov 27 '11 at 11:35
    
Anyone please help,I want the output to write to a file in same format –  newcane Nov 27 '11 at 12:33
    
@Ryder: If you're not getting the answer that you desire, please update your question rather than add comments to arbitrary answers. I also recommend reading tinyurl.com/so-hints to help you get better answers. –  Johnsyweb Nov 27 '11 at 21:36
    
@Ryder: does my updated answer help you at all? –  Johnsyweb Nov 28 '11 at 19:43
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