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I've just started learning Objective C and getting a bit stumped with arrays. Basically, I want to set the contents of an array based on a switch/case variable. I can set the array when I declare it as follows:

int aTarget[3][2] = {{-1,0}, {-1,-1}, {-1,-1}};

However, I need to set the contents of the array based the value of an enum variable 'dir'. But I get an error "Expected expression" on each line where I try to set the contents of the array:

//define the target cells
int aTarget[3][2];

switch (dir) {
    case north:
        aTarget = {{0,-1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}};
        break;
    case east:
        aTarget = {{1,0}, {1,-1}, {1,1}};
        break;
    case south:
        aTarget = {{0,1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}};
        break;
    case west:
        aTarget = {{-1,0}, {-1,1}, {-1,-1}};
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

I've been searching the net but most examples use nsArray but that seems a bit overkill for a simple list of integers.Please let me know where I'm going wrong. Many thanks, Trevor

share|improve this question
3  
If you're not using NSArray, then this is more of a C problem, not Objective-C. The reason you're getting an error is because you can't assign multiple array elements like that after the variable has been initialised. You have to set the elements individually if you want that code to compile. – Chris Parton Nov 27 '11 at 11:39
1  
As Chris says, this is a C problem, not directly related to Objective-C. Thus I added the related tags to your question – AliSoftware Nov 27 '11 at 11:45
up vote 0 down vote accepted
typedef enum {north = 0, east, south, west} Direction;
const int COLS = 6;

Direction dir = north;
int targets[4][COLS] =
{{0,-1,-1,-1,1,-1},
 {1,0,1,-1,1,1},
 {0,1,-1,-1,1,-1},
 {-1,0,-1,1,-1,-1}};

//define the target cells
int aTarget[COLS];

// Fill the array with the appropriate values, dependent upon the
// value of dir.
for (int i = 0; i < COLS; i++)
    aTarget[i] = targets[dir][i];
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. So I can set the array like this – user1067792 Nov 27 '11 at 11:53
    
Unfortunately, assigning to a 2D array using a 1D index isn't acceptable. I haven't used C in a while haha. I'm still working on it though :) – Chris Parton Nov 27 '11 at 11:53
    
Not sure how to add carriage returns on this site – user1067792 Nov 27 '11 at 11:53
    
case north: //aTarget = {{0,-1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}}; aTarget[0][0] = 0; aTarget[0][1] = -1; aTarget[1][0] = -1; aTarget[1][1] = -1; aTarget[2][0] = 1; aTarget[2][1] = -1; break; But this seems very inelegant – user1067792 Nov 27 '11 at 11:54
    
@user1067792 - yeah, that's why I'm fiddling around with the above code in an attempt to make it slightly more elegant. Regardless, the solution will not be very scalable. – Chris Parton Nov 27 '11 at 11:56
aTarget = {{0,-1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}};
         // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Initializer list

This is not valid C or C++. Initialization of array elements using initializer list is possible only at the time of declaration. You have to do make assignments for individual array elements and there is no other choice.

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Learning objective C requires that you have a good grasp of C... The code you posted shows that you are a beginner at C as well :) sooooooooo.. .I shall answer the "C" question for you.

int aTarget[3][2] = {{-1,0}, {-1,-1}, {-1,-1}};

is initialization of a declaration. This can be done because the program "saves" this data at compile time and then loads it up in memory as is and points the aTarget (which is a pointer actually) to the beginning of it.

Now let's say you wanted to put {{0,-1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}} into aTarget at runtime (as in your switch statement enum North)

you can do that using one of two methods:

1) Set values element by element. For example,

  aTarget[0][0] = -1;
  aTarget[0][1] = 0;

  aTarget[1][0] = -1;
  aTarget[1][1] = -1;

  aTarget[2][0] = -1;
  aTarget[2][1] = -1;

cumbersome but this is essentially what you are going to do either expanded like this or through some clever looping.

2) The other way is if the map is static (like yours) to declare some constants and use them

int aTarget[3][2];

const int dueNorth[3][2] = {{0,-1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}};
const int dueSouth[3][2] = {{0, 1}, {-1,-1}, {1,-1}};


const int dueEast[3][2] =  {{1,0}, {1,-1}, {1,1}};
const int dueWest[3][2] =  {{1,0}, {1,-1}, {1,1}};

and then in your switch something like:

switch (dir) {
    case north:
        memcpy(aTarget, dueNorth, sizeof(aTarget)); 
        break;
    case east:
        memcpy(aTarget, dueEast, sizeof(aTarget)); 
        break;
    case south:
        memcpy(aTarget, dueSouth, sizeof(aTarget)); 
        break;
    case west:
        memcpy(aTarget, dueWest, sizeof(aTarget)); 
        break;
    default:
        break;
} 

Mind you that this is ugly programming there are FAR cuter ways of organizing your data efficiently, compactly and at the same time in a way that's more natural to program.

For instance you could encode the whole thing in one big array and initialize it:

enum { NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, WEST };

int target[4][3][2] = { {{0,-1}, {-1, -1}, {1, -1}}, {{1, 0}, { 1, -1}, {1, 1}}, {{0, 1}, {-1, -1}, {1, -1}}, {{-1, 0}, {-1, 1}, {-1, -1}} };

But this is not easy to maintain ... although you could get your coordinates out with Target[dir][x][y]

You should really split this data up into structures, but that's another lesson on its own. :)

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