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Let's say I have a class and I want one of its methods to behave differently depending on an argument. What I want to do is something like this (I know this doesn't work in Java):

class myClass(int a) {
    public void myMethod() {
        if (a == 1)
            // do something
        if (a == 2)
            // do something else
    }
}

Is there a way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have two ways to do that.

  • Pass the argument to the class contructor, and keep a local reference to it. You can then use it in all the methods of your class.

Like this:

class MyClass {
    private final int a;

    public MyClass(int a) {
        this.a = a;
    }

    public void myMethod() {
        if (a == 1)
            // do something
        if (a == 2)
            // do something else
    }
}
  • Pass the argument to the method, if you intend to use it only in that method.

Like that:

class MyClass {
    public void myMethod(int a) {
        if (a == 1)
            // do something
        if (a == 2)
            // do something else
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
yes, constructor is best suited. –  user1010399 Nov 27 '11 at 12:56
    
It depends if that's just an argument to the method, or something that needs to be reused multiple times within the class –  Guillaume Nov 27 '11 at 12:57
    
Thank you, this works. But when I declare it as "private final int", it says "cannot assign a value to final variable hashType". So I declared it as a variable. Maybe I was doing something wrong? –  hattenn Nov 27 '11 at 12:58
1  
final only means that once the value is assigned in the constructor (or at declaration time), it cannot be changed. It's not necessary, and it will not work if indeed you try to re-allocate it later. Private is good and should be used, to preserve encapsulation. –  Guillaume Nov 27 '11 at 13:02
    
@hattenn: each keyword in java has specific properties so it's better to know the properties before using. –  user1010399 Nov 27 '11 at 19:55

The argument must be passed to the method, not to the class:

class MyClass { // note that class names should start with an uppercase letter.
    public void myMethod(int a) {
        if (a == 1)
            // do something
        if (a == 2)
            // do something else
    }
}

Read the Java language tutorial.

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2  
Class names "should" not start with an uppercase, it's just good practice to follow the Sun naming standard. –  Guillaume Nov 27 '11 at 12:51
    
And these good practices "should" be followed, thus class names "should" start with an uppercase letter. If it was an absolute rule, I would have said "must", and not "should". –  JB Nizet Nov 27 '11 at 13:36
    
Oh well, ok, English is not my native language ;) –  Guillaume Nov 27 '11 at 17:48

You can pass this argument in constructor

class MyClass {
    private int a;
    public MyClass(int a){
        this.a = a;
    }
    public void myMethod() {
        if (a == 1)
            // do something
        if (a == 2)
            // do something else
    }
}
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Polymorphism is the way to go. Define your base class first with an abstract method myMethod() and then extend it with two classes providing two different implementations of the method.

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Oooh no it's not! Inheritance is evil and will most likely produce unreadable code, and difficult to maintain and test. Composition over inheritance, anytime. –  Guillaume Nov 27 '11 at 13:05

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