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I want to write a pattern matching like the follows:

match ... with
...
| Const1 (r, c) | Const2 (m, n) 
  -> expr

It returns an error: Error: Variable c must occur on both sides of this | pattern.

Do I have to write expr twice (one time for Const1, the other time for Const2)? Could anyone help?

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ah, the lost skill of reading error messages.. –  ygrek Jan 10 '12 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As the error message said, Or pattern (| pattern) requires binding to the same set of variables. Therefore:

match ... with
...
| Const1 (m, n) | Const2 (m, n) 
  -> expr

or

match ... with
...
| Const1 (m, n) | Const2 (n, m) 
  -> expr

would work.

Of course, you only can do that if Const1 and Const2 accept the same type. In some cases, you still do so if you have parts of constructs with the same type:

match ... with
...
| Const1 (m, _) | Const2 (_, m) 
  -> expr

The pitfall of Or pattern is that you don't know which constructor you are in. So if logic of expr depends on Const1 or Const2, you couldn't use Or pattern anymore.

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As an example of why this would be a problem, consider what would happen if expr depended on r or c and the object you were matching happened to be of type Const2:

let c2 = Const2(1,2) in
match c2 with
...
| Const1 (r,c) | Const2 (m,n) -> r + 1

Since c2 is of type Const2, r is not defined on the right side of the ->, so OCaml wouldn't know how to evaluate r+1. The compiler catches that this will happen, and makes you change your code to avoid it.

My guess is that expr doesn't depend on whether the input is of type Const1 or Const2 (otherwise you would have put those cases on separate lines with different expressions), so you might be able to get away with

match ... with
...
| Const1 _ | Const2 _ -> expr

If you need to match on some field that Const1 and Const2 both have, see pad's answer.

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