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Is it possible using only CSS?

This we can all do:

normal circle

But can we do this?

transparent circle in a div

Condition: Transparency must be preserved. Thus the problem is not solved by putting a circle in a solid color div box.

share|improve this question
    
By 'only CSS' presumably you prefer to not use images/image-masks? – David Thomas Nov 27 '11 at 15:34
    
@RokoC.Buljan Why did you close this question as duplicate? The question you refer to was asked 14 days ago whereas this one was asked 2 years ago? – web-tiki Oct 30 '14 at 14:24
    
This Question should be a duplicate of THIS question, not the other way around. This question has better answers. – TylerH Oct 30 '14 at 14:40
    
@TylerH Yes! I've mistakenly closed an older question (THIS one) for a newer question. My bad :| (Next time I'll try to look closer at all my opened tabs!) – Roko C. Buljan Oct 30 '14 at 17:10
    
I want to do this, but using an element with a background-image and not only a plain color. Is that possible? – Toskan May 8 '15 at 11:21
up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can achieve a transparent cut out circle with 2 different techniques :

1.SVG

The following example uses an inline svg with a path element. The circle is made wwith 2 arc commands :

body{background: url('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8760/17195790401_ceeeafcddb_o.jpg');background-size:cover;}
svg{
  display:block;
  width:70%;
  height:auto;
  margin:0 auto;
}
path{
  transition:fill .5s;
  fill:#E3DFD2;
}
path:hover{
  fill:pink;
}
<svg viewbox="-10 -1 30 12">
  <path d="M-10 -1 H30 V12 H-10z M 5 5 m -5, 0 a 5,5 0 1,0 10,0 a 5,5 0 1,0 -10,0z"/>
</svg>

The main advantages of using SVG in this case are :

  • Shorter code
  • You can easily use an image or gradient to fill the circle mask
  • maintain the boundaries of the shape and trigger mouse envents only over the fill respecting the mask (hover the transparent hexagon in the example)

transparent cut out circle

2. BOX-SHADOWS

Create a div with overflow:hidden; and a round pseudo element inside it with border-radius. Give it a huge box-shadow and no background :

div{
    position:relative;
    width:500px; height:200px;
    margin:0 auto;
    overflow:hidden;
}
div:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    left:175px; top:25px;
    border-radius:100%;
    width:150px; height:150px;
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 2000px #E3DFD2;
}

body{background: url('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8760/17195790401_ceeeafcddb_o.jpg');background-size:cover;}
<div></div>

Browser support for box-shadows is IE9+ see canIuse

The same approach would be to use border instead of box-shadows. It is interesting if you need to support borowsers that don't support box-shadows like IE8. The technique is the same but you need to compensate with the top and left values to get the circle in the center of the div :

body{
    background: url('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8760/17195790401_ceeeafcddb_o.jpg');
    background-size:cover;
}
div{
    position:relative;
    width:500px; height:200px;
    margin:0 auto;
    overflow:hidden;
}
div:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    left:-325px; top:-475px;
    border-radius:100%;
    width:150px; height:150px;
    border:500px solid #E3DFD2;
}
<div></div>

share|improve this answer

It can be done using a radial gradient background and pointer-events (to allow mouse interaction behind through the circle layer, e.g. text selection). Here's a demo page and a screenshot:

enter image description here

And this would be the code for it:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<style type="text/css" media="screen">
body {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

.underneath {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 265px 0 0 0;
  width: 600px;
}

.overlay {
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  position: absolute;
  width: 600px;
  height: 600px;
  background: -moz-radial-gradient(transparent 150px, rgba(0,0,0,1) 150px);
  background: -webkit-radial-gradient(transparent 150px, rgba(0,0,0,1) 150px);
  background: -ms-radial-gradient(transparent 150px, rgba(0,0,0,1) 150px);
  background: -o-radial-gradient(transparent 150px, rgba(0,0,0,1) 150px);
  pointer-events: none; /* send mouse events beneath this layer */
}
</style>
</head>
<body>

<p class="underneath">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor
  incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis
  nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
  Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore
  eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt
  in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
</p>

<div class="overlay"></div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one. Thank you, good sir. – chris Nov 27 '11 at 15:40
    
@chris You're welcome. If you're interested in a rectangle punch-through window, I've posted a similar answer a while ago: stackoverflow.com/questions/7979675/… – Ionuț G. Stan Nov 27 '11 at 15:42
    
This however gives a circle with very "rough" edges, so if anybody has a solution that produces a nicely rendered punch-through circle it is highly welcome. – chris Nov 27 '11 at 16:01
    
@chris if the size of the circle is fixed, then go with a centered background image, but keep the pointer-events part. If the size varies, then you can create masks out of SVG for WebKit developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS/-webkit-mask and Firefox developer.mozilla.org/En/Applying_SVG_effects_to_HTML_content – Ionuț G. Stan Nov 27 '11 at 16:42
1  
The fiddle is broken – BenRacicot Jan 31 '14 at 21:41

Referring to web-tiki's answer I'd like to add that you can always center a div with translate(-50%,-50%), so it'd be no problem to use the border-property, which has better browser support.

div{
    position:relative;
    width:500px; 
    height:200px;
    margin:0 auto;
    overflow:hidden;
}
div:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    left:50%;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
    border-radius:50%;
    width:150px; height:150px;
    border: 1000px solid rebeccapurple;
}

body{background: url('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8760/17195790401_ceeeafcddb_o.jpg');background-size:cover;}
<div></div>

You can get really creative with this technique:

document.addEventListener( "DOMContentLoaded", function(){ 
	setInterval(function(){
		if(document.getElementById("moving").style.height === "500px"){
			document.getElementById("moving").style.height = "0px";
		} else {		
			document.getElementById("moving").style.height = "500px";
		}
	}, 2000);
});
#container {
	width: 500px;
	margin: 0 auto;
	border: 1px solid black;
	overflow:hidden;
	position: relative;
}


#circle{
    position:relative;
    height:150px;
    margin:0 auto;
	clear:left;
	overflow:hidden;
}
#circle::before, #circle::after {
    content:'';
    border-radius:50%;
	position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
}
#circle::before {
    height: 140px;
    width: 140px;
    background: rebeccapurple;
}
#circle::after{
    width:150px; 
	height:150px;
    border: 2000px solid rebeccapurple;
}

#line {
	margin: 0 auto;
	width: 6px;
	height: 200px;
	position: relative;
}
#line::before, #line::after {
	content: " ";
	background-color: rebeccapurple;
    height: 200px;
	width:2000px;
	position:absolute;
}
#line::before {
	right: 100%;
}
#line::after { 
	left: 100%;
}

#moving {
	height: 0px;
    width: 100%;
    background: blue;
    transition: 2s height;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    z-index: -1;
}
body{
	background: url('https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8760/17195790401_ceeeafcddb_o.jpg');background-size:cover;
}
<div id="container">
	<div id="circle"></div>
	<div id="line"></div> 
    <div id="circle"></div>
    <div id="moving"></div>
</div>

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