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In a loop structure such as for, does the break; "know" when it's under indentation levels?

For example:

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    for (s = 0; s <= i; s++) {
        if (s == 7) break;
    }
}

Will this break; stop both for or just the inner one?

Thanks

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3  
which programming language are you using? –  sll Nov 27 '11 at 15:25
    
@sll asks a valid question, but I've never seen a language with that style of syntax in which it would do anything but break the inner loop. And I've see a lot of those languages, the syntax influence of the language B is felt to this day, through C, C++, C#, D, Java, JavaScript, and more. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '11 at 15:27
1  
@schnaader: I've rolled back your edit. It's completely inappropriate to just assume the OP is talking about C and add that tag. The code in question could just as easily be Java, JavaScript, C#, D, or any of several others. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '11 at 15:31
    
Please tag the Q with the programming language you are asking the Q in reference with, that way we could cite you references for that particular language. –  Alok Save Nov 27 '11 at 15:36

6 Answers 6

You haven't said what language you're using, but I've never seen a language with that sort of syntax that did anything other than break the inner loop (allowing the outer to continue). Still, though, you really should mention what language you're using! :-)

Many of the languages with that sort of syntax support labels and directed breaks, which can be used to break the outer loop. That usually looks like this:

outer: for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    inner: for (s = 0; s <= i; s++) {
        if (s == 7) break outer;
    }
}

(The inner label is optional in this case because we haven't used it for anything, I've just included it for completeness.)

That example would break both the inner and outer loops. It's valid in Java, JavaScript, and probably others; in C you'd need a label after the loop and (shudder) a goto and you'd probably be better off (arguably are always better off) just including some kind of termination condition in the outer loop's check that the inner loop sets.

Here's a live example in JavaScript (I've used smaller numbers to make it more obvious): Without the directed break | With the directed break.

Also note that in these languages, indentation is completely irrelevant. This code is exactly the same your code (just markedly less readable):

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
for (s = 0; s <= i; s++) {
if (s == 7) break;
}
}

This is also identical (and dramatically less readable):

        for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    for (s = 0; s <= i; s++) {
if (s == 7) break;
    }
        }

Obviously you'd never want to do that, but the point is that indentation is for people, not compilers (in languages with this style of syntax).

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It will break the inner loop only.

Refer the MSDN doccumentation.

In loops, break terminates execution of the nearest enclosing do, for, or while statement. Control passes to the statement that follows the terminated statement, if any.

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We don't know that the OP is using C, that was an invention by someone other than the OP editing the question. I don't think I'd use MSDN as a C reference anyway, but... :-) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '11 at 15:32
    
@T.J.Crowder: I saw the Q with an C tag, Also, I don't think there is anything wrong in that particular link on MSDN. Irrespective of the language the break would only terminate the inner loop. –  Alok Save Nov 27 '11 at 15:34
    
@AIs: Yes, I figured you'd seen the bad tag, that's why I was telling you that the OP hadn't specified C anywhere. And agreed, I've never seen any language with that sort of syntax that did anything other than breaking the inner loop. Disagree about using MSDN for C reference, but whatever, it's not particularly important. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '11 at 15:35

Indentation levels don't matter in languages that use accolades. Only the inner loop will be broken.

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It will stop just the inner one.

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Just the inner one. Break will break out of a single loop. You need extra logic to break out of nested loops completely, or else you can use return if your nested loop is encapsulated in a function.

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Just the inner one. Some languages have a way to choose which to break.

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