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I have the following view:

CREATE VIEW FilmTableView AS

    SELECT  (TitleSP || " / " || TitleEN) as Title,  
            CompanyName, 
            CoverURI,
            CompanyFilmRelation.CompanyId,
            CompanyFilmRelation.FilmId 

    FROM    Film
    JOIN    CompanyFilmRelation on CompanyFilmRelation.FilmId = Film.FilmId 
    JOIN    Company on CompanyFilmRelation.CompanyId = Company.CompanyId 

    ORDER BY Title;

But I might end up with records where either TitleSP or TitleEN are empty. In such case, I'd like to only include whichever column is not null and not include the "/".

Is there a way to do this? That is, something following the logic of:

if(TitleSP && TitleEN)
   select (TitleSP || " / " || TitleEN) as Title
else
   select (TitleSP ? TitleSP : TitleEn) as Title
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT CASE WHEN (TitleSP = '' OR TitleSP IS NULL)
                THEN COALESCE(TitleEN, '')
            WHEN (TitleEN = '' OR TitleEN IS NULL)
                THEN TitleSP
            ELSE (TitleSP || ' / ' || TitleEN)
       END AS Title, 
...
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a bunch. Worked! I just didn't know you could do a switch/case sort of control flow inside the query. Thanks! – SaldaVonSchwartz Nov 28 '11 at 5:09

In sql if one operator is null then the expression becomes null, you can use this with the coalesce function to solve this problem easily. Something like this should work (nb not tested):

   COALESCE(TitleSP || " / " || TitleEN,TitleSP,TitleEN,"No Title") as Title

If you can't do it this way then case is the way to go, something like this (will also handle empty strings):

  TitleSP || 
  CASE WHEN ((ISNULL(TRIM(TitleSP),"") = "") OR (ISNULL(TRIM(TitleEN),"") = "")) THEN "" ELSE " / " END || 
  TitleEN as Title
share|improve this answer
    
hmm didn't seem to work. I just tried it and say I have a film with TitleSP = A but no TitleEN, I still get "A /" if I query Title. Any thoughts? – SaldaVonSchwartz Nov 27 '11 at 16:27
    
The problem is that COALESCE will always return TitleSP || " / " || TitleEN because this is the first non-null argument, regardless of TitleEN or TitleSP, because of the " / " – SaldaVonSchwartz Nov 27 '11 at 16:34
    
@SaldaVonSchwartz = then SQLite does not reduce to null if one of the operands of a equation is null? – Hogan Nov 27 '11 at 16:54
    
According to the docs, COALESCE returns the first non-null argument. That's what it does. So for instance, COALESCE("/" || null, "a") would still return "/" because "/" concatenated with null is "/" and "/" is not null and is the first arg to the function. :s – SaldaVonSchwartz Nov 27 '11 at 17:08
    
@SaldaVonSchwartz - This is different than every other SQL -- all other SQLs return null for null || "/". The docs only talk about +, however that is the way concatenate should work to be similar. sqlite.org/nulls.html My guess is you have another typo or the column is not null it is the empty string. – Hogan Nov 27 '11 at 17:32

Use the IFNULL function.

CREATE VIEW FilmTableView AS

    SELECT  ifnull((TitleSP || " / " || TitleEN), ifnull(TitleSP, TitleEN)) as Title,  
            CompanyName, 
            CoverURI,
            CompanyFilmRelation.CompanyId,
            CompanyFilmRelation.FilmId 

    FROM    Film
    JOIN    CompanyFilmRelation on CompanyFilmRelation.FilmId = Film.FilmId 
    JOIN    Company on CompanyFilmRelation.CompanyId = Company.CompanyId 

    ORDER BY Title;
share|improve this answer
1  
If COALESCE did not work then this won't. – Hogan Nov 27 '11 at 21:45
SELECT COALESCE(
                NULLIF(TitleSP, '') || ' / ' || NULLIF(TitleEN, ''), 
                NULLIF(TitleSP, ''), 
                NULLIF(TitleEN, ''), 
                ''
               ), 
...
share|improve this answer

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