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I am trying to determine why writing random values to an array is causing a problem.

I actually ask rand() to generate numbers between 1 and 10(rand() %10 +1, with srand(time(NULL)) before) and the first value is ALWAYS higher than 10: it's a random one too, between 10 and 20. I really do not know how to fix that, as it looks like an issue with the rand and srand functions. Nevertheless this is my code:

Edit: correct code, now

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#define SIZEA 100
#define SIZEFREQ 10

int main()
{
    int a[SIZEA]={0},frequency[SIZEFREQ]={0};
    int i,temp,gothrough;

    srand(time(NULL));

    for(i=0;i<=SIZEA-1;i++)
    {
        a[i]=rand() %10 +1;
        ++frequency[a[i]-1];
    }

    printf("These are the elements in the vector:\n");
    for(i=0;i<=SIZEA-1;i++)
    {
        printf("%3d,",a[i]);
    }

    printf("\nLet's try to put them in order\n");
    for(gothrough=0;gothrough<=SIZEA-1;gothrough++)
    {
        for(i=0;i<=SIZEA-2;i++)
    {
        if (a[i]>a[i+1])
        {
            temp=a[i];
            a[i]=a[i+1];
            a[i+1]=temp;
        }
    }
}

for(i=0;i<=SIZEA-1;i++)
{
    printf("%3d,",a[i]);
}

printf("\n\nValue Frequency\n");
for(i=0;i<=SIZEFREQ-1;i++)
{
    printf("%5d%10d\n",i+1,frequency[i]);
}

return 0;
}`
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There's no way rand() % 10 + 1 can return a value outside the [1;10] interval. I've run your code, and it appears to work just fine. –  NPE Nov 27 '11 at 16:24
    
The last loop will output frequency[11] which is undefined behavior. Could that be the source of your confusion? –  user97370 Nov 27 '11 at 16:36
    
When you added the new code why did you leave the incorrect version? If anyone wants to see what used to be there they can look at the edit history (click the time where it says "edited TIMESTAMP"). –  dmckee Nov 27 '11 at 18:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason is simple.

a[i] is between 1 and 10 and therefore when you write:

++frequency[a[i]+1];

you are filling indices 2 to 11 of frequency. However, frequency has only indices 0 to 10. Therefore you are going over the array frequency and into the array a and writing over a[0]. This happens when a[i] is 10. Since with 100 numbers, there is 10% chance you get 10, you increment a[0] (by incrementing frequency[11]) about 10 times. Since the first value was also between 1 and 10, the final value gets between 10 and 20.

Edit: For the same reason you index a from 0 to SIZE-1, you should also index frequency from 0 to 10. What you are doing is to create indices from 1 to 10, and also +1 them! For example this here:

for(i=1;i<=10;i++)
    printf("%5d%10d\n",i,frequency[i+1]);

should be

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
    printf("%5d%10d\n",i,frequency[i]);

Notice both starting from 0, not going to 10, and indexing frequency by i rather than i+1

Alternatively, you could have

for(i=1;i<=10;i++)
    printf("%5d%10d\n",i,frequency[i-1]);

that indexes frequency by i-1 to make the index right.

share|improve this answer
    
I have now corrected my source, as you can see here: pastebin.com/evtivzRv –  user1068051 Nov 27 '11 at 16:58
    
Good. In your code, remember to change %10 to %SIZEFREQ ;) –  Shahbaz Nov 27 '11 at 17:30

I compiled your code and it generates between 1 and 10. There is NO way to get over range 0-9 (or 1 - 10 with +1) with % used, since as soon as it would reach 10, that would mean that the / would be 1 higher AND modulo would have to start again at 0. EDIT: You can't divide 30 by 10 and say it's 2 with a remainder 10, since this remainder would translate to +1 of 10ths, that is, 30 divided by 10 = 3 and remainder 0.

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