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I have a long[] with its values. The thing I need is to have a sorted array that contains the indices of my first array.

For example:

INPUT:

long[ ] values = {1 , 3 , 2 , 5 , 4};

OUTPUT:

long[ ] SortIndex = {0 , 2 , 1 , 4 , 3}

which means:

values[0] < values[2] < values[1] < values[4] < values[3] 

...descending or ascending order of the SortIndex is not important.

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Welcome to Stack Overflow! To the right when you were asking your question there was a box titled "How to Format". Worth a read, as are the various things accessible via the [?] button above the text area, and this editing tips page: stackoverflow.com/editing-help I've cleaned up the question for you this time 'round. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 27 '11 at 16:23
1  
Are your values unique? –  Ed Staub Nov 27 '11 at 16:36
    
thank you so much for your editing no, there is no guarantee that the values are unique –  SAbbasizadeh Nov 27 '11 at 17:34
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
long[] values = {1 , 3 , 2 , 5 , 4};
Map<Long, Integer> indices = new HashMap<Long, Integer>();
for (int index = 0; index < values.length; index++) {
    indices.put(values[index], index);
}

long[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(values, values.length);
Arrays.sort(copy);
for (int index = 0; index < copy.length; index++) {
    copy[index] = indices.get(copy[index]);
}

Your list of indices will be in copy.

Working example here: http://ideone.com/A9Imz

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3  
this is true when your values are unique, I don't thing he has mentioned any such constraint. –  prap19 Nov 27 '11 at 16:32
    
Rather a simpler implementation could be to write your own sort algorithm, and while in the swapping step of values, swap the "sortedIndex" as well. roseindia.net/java/beginners/arrayexamples/mergeSort.shtml if required, I can write the code on how to do it. –  prap19 Nov 27 '11 at 16:39
    
@prap19 - I wouldn't call that a "simpler" solution. Certainly it would require more code than shown above, even if using a trivial/inefficient sorting algorithm. But yes, that is the necessary approach if the solution needs to correctly handle duplicate values. –  aroth Nov 27 '11 at 21:20
    
yes, by "simpler" I meant without using extra data structure like hashmap in your case? do we need that? –  prap19 Nov 27 '11 at 21:26
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You could do this by adding pairs of Long to a TreeMap, where the key is values[index] and the value is index.

traversing the map's iterator will yield the sortindex values.

update

Seeing that there is no accepted answer, here is the code resulting from following up the comments to this answer.

    long[] values = { 1 , 3 , 2 , 5 , 4 };
    int[]  output = new int[values.length];

    Map<Long, Integer> map = new TreeMap<Long, Integer>();

    for (int n = 0; n < values.length; n++) {
        map.put(values[n] * values.length + n, n);
    }

    int n = 0;

    for (Integer index: map.values()) {
        output[n++] = index;
    }

    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(output));

Output:

[0, 2, 1, 4, 3]

the solution also works when duplicates are part of the input:

long[] values = { 8, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1 };

Output:

[4, 5, 3, 2, 1, 0]

If it is permissible to receive the sortOrder array as an Integer array, the second loop can be replaced by:

Integer[] output = map.values().toArray(new Integer[values.length]);
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how are you using SortedIndex information? –  prap19 Nov 27 '11 at 16:42
1  
@prap19, the TreeMap will sort it's keys in natural order, iterating over the map (map.entrySet().iterator()) will give you the sorted values as keys and their original indexes as values. –  rsp Nov 27 '11 at 17:37
    
SortIndex[] is the array of indexes different from natural index of the numbers in the values[] array. Can you still map the values to the index that it pointed to before sorting? –  prap19 Nov 27 '11 at 17:43
    
@prap19, of course - if the map would change the key-value pairs it wouldn't be a map :-) while itarating the map you just store its values in the sortIndex array which is your output. –  rsp Nov 27 '11 at 18:06
1  
@AKJ, if values are not unique, you can make their map keys unique by using values[index] * values.length + index as key :-) –  rsp Nov 27 '11 at 19:21
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One simplistic idea is to find the index of minimum value in each iteration and then put a large value in that index. This will work even if there are duplicates. eg:

long[] values = { 1, 3, 2, 5, 4 };

long[] indices = new long[values.length];
for (int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
    long min = Long.MAX_VALUE;
    int minIndex = 0;
    for (int j = 0; j < values.length; j++) {
        if (min > values[j]) {
            minIndex = j;
            min = values[j];
        }
    }
    values[minIndex] = Long.MAX_VALUE;
    indices[i] = minIndex;
}

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(indices));
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