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If I reset to a changeset that is, let's say HEAD^, then git log --all no longer displays the newer changeset above the current one. Is there a way to make it display as well?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

git reflog should display the commit previously referenced by HEAD before your reset.
(git reflog, your safety net)

See "Undoing a git reset --hard HEAD~1" as a concrete example.
You can also try, with git log alone, the -g option:

-g, --walk-reflogs

Instead of walking the commit ancestry chain, walk reflog entries from the most recent one to older ones

After all, git reflog can be done by a git log -g --oneline.

git log --walk-reflogs master # show reflog entries for master

The OP rFactor adds:

Can I filter out everything except Merge and Commit reflogs?
For example, I want to get rid of Checkout and Updating HEAD.

I don't see how you can achieve that without filtering the output.
Jefromi concurs in the comments:

git reflog ... | grep -v 'checkout:\|updating HEAD'

Also after you figure out what commit you want to see, you can then use log normally:

git log HEAD@{7} 
# or 
git log <SHA1>
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Is there a way I can force git log to display it? –  Tower Nov 27 '11 at 16:31
    
@rFactor: I have updated my answer regarding git log. –  VonC Nov 27 '11 at 16:40
    
Interesting. One more thing, can I filter out everything except Merge and Commit reflogs? For example, I want to get rid of Checkout and Updating HEAD. –  Tower Nov 27 '11 at 16:49
    
@rFactor: git reflog ... | grep -v 'checkout:\|updating HEAD' –  Jefromi Nov 27 '11 at 18:33
    
@rFactor: Also after you figure out what commit you want to see, you can then use log normally: git log HEAD@{7} or git log <SHA1> –  Jefromi Nov 27 '11 at 18:36

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