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I am finding that the more semantic I make my HTML using the new HTML 5 tags the easier it is to style and work with the document. I am new to HTML 5 and only a HTML novice but I want to make my HTML 5 as semantically correct as possible. Currently I have my HTML 5 footer divided like so.

    <footer>
        <section>
            <h2>Contact</h2>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="snip">Email</a></li>
                <li><a href="snip">Tweet</a></li>
            </ul>
        </section>
        <section>
            <h2>Explore</h2>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="snip">Stack Overflow</a></li>
                <li><a href="snip">LinkedIn</a></li>
                <li><a href="snip">Flickr</a></li>
                <li><a href="snip">Google+</a></li>
            </ul>
        </section>
        <section>
            <h2>About</h2>
            <p>
               snip
            </p>
        </section>
    </footer>

The particular tags I am querying are section and use of the h2 tag. I would think section is more semantically correct that aside or article as each section of the footer is, well, a section. The h2 is also a concern to me. I would like to use H1 as it is the first heading in the section but I am afraid the google spider will shun me and keep me from making web friends if I use h1 over h2.

Thoughts from people who have worked with semantics are very much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
dev.w3.org/html5/spec-author-view/… could be intresting for you, if Google+ is meant to be the way to contact you. Maybe you snipped out an emaillink in the "about"-section ... I don't know. – Seybsen Nov 27 '11 at 18:39
    
The email and tweet parts are direct contact, the other is a link to my prospective pages rather than a way to contact me (although admittedly, they also have direct contact methods on them.) – deanvmc Nov 27 '11 at 18:50
    
okay, then see my answer below. – Seybsen Nov 27 '11 at 18:57
    
This is a useful tool to get an idea of outlining gsnedders.html5.org/outliner. – Rich Bradshaw Nov 27 '11 at 19:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may want to add the address-tag around your contact information:

<footer>
    <section>
        <h1>Contact</h1>
        <address>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="snip">Email</a></li>
                <li><a href="snip">Tweet</a></li>
            </ul>
        </address>
    </section>
    <section>
        <h1>Explore</h1>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="snip">Stack Overflow</a></li>
            <li><a href="snip">LinkedIn</a></li>
            <li><a href="snip">Flickr</a></li>
            <li><a href="snip">Google+</a></li>
        </ul>
    </section>
    <section>
        <h1>About</h1>
        <p>
           snip
        </p>
    </section>
</footer>

this would be semantically correct but watch out for older browsers which are having problems with the implementation of <address>. In Firefox 3.6.12 were no block-elements allowed to be placed inside <address> like discussed here.

EDIT: Also change the <h2> to <h1>:

Notice how the use of section means that the author can use h1 elements throughout, without having to worry about whether a particular section is at the top level, the second level, the third level, and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
Any thoughts on the h1 and other uses of the section tag? – deanvmc Nov 27 '11 at 19:22
    
Cheers for the edit :) – deanvmc Nov 28 '11 at 9:21
2  
Note that this use of address would only be correct if there are no article elements on the page that are authored by someone else. If there are such article elements, you'd have to nest an additional address element in that article with the contact data of that author. – unor Sep 17 '12 at 0:53

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