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I'm trying to write a signal handler to catch any number of consecutive SIGINT signals and prevent the program from exiting. The program is a simple file server. The handler sets a global flag which causes the while loop accepting new connections to end, a call to pthread_exit() ensures that main lets current connections finish before exiting. It all goes like clockwork when I hit ctrl-C once but a second time exits the program immediately.

I tried first with signal():

signal(SIGINT, catch_sigint);

...

static void catch_sigint(int signo)
{
    ...
    signal(SIGINT, catch_sigint);
}

I also tried it using sigaction:

struct sigaction sigint_handler;
sigint_handler.sa_handler = catch_sigint;
sigemptyset(&sigint_handler.sa_mask);
sigint_handler.sa_flags = 0;
sigaction(SIGINT, &sigint_handler, NULL);

Unsure how to "reinstall" this one I just duplicated this code in the handler similar to the handler using the signal() method.

Neither one of these works as I expected.


Additional info:

The program is a simple file server. It receives a request from the client which is simply a string consisting of the requested file name. It utilizes pthreads so that transfers can occur simultaneously. Upon receiving SIGINT I wish for the server to exit the while loop and wait for all current transfers to complete then close. As is, no matter how I code the signal handler a second SIGINT terminates the program immediately.

int serverStop = 0;

...

int main()
{
   /* set up the server -- socket(), bind() etc. */

   struct sigaction sigint_hadler;
   sigint_handler.sa_handler = catch_sigint;
   sigint_handler.sa_flags = 0;
   sigemptyset(&sigint_handler.sa_mask);
   sigaction(SIGINT, &sigint_handler, NULL);

   /* signal(SIGINT, catch_sigint); */

   while(serverStop == 0)
   {
      /* accept new connections and pthread_create() for each */
   }
   pthread_exit(NULL);
}

...

static void catch_sigint(int signo)
{
   serverStop = 1;

   /* signal(SIGINT, catch_sigint) */
}

I don't think any other code could be pertinent but feel free to ask for elaboration

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

NOTE: this is largely guesswork.

I'm pretty sure that calling pthread_exit in the main thread is a bad idea. If the main thread has quit, then the OS may try to send subsequent signals to some other thread.

I recommend that instead of using pthread_exit in the main thread, you just pthread_join() all the other threads, then exit normally.

But it's also important to ensure that the other threads do not get the signals. Normally this is done with sigprocmask (or maybe more correctly pthread_sigmask, which is the same under Linux) to mask the signal out in the worker threads. This ensures that the signal is never delivered to them.

Note that to avoid race conditions, you should use pthread_sigmask in the main thread just before creating a child thread, then set the signal mask back again in the main thread afterwards. This ensures that there is no window, however small, during which a child thread can possibly get unwanted signals.

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1  
This is a pretty bogus answer: calling pthread_exit in main thread is perfectly fine, and for this particular signal handler there is no difference whatsoever which thread the signal handler is invoked on. Neither is delivery of SIGINT guaranteed to be on the main thread (while it continues to exist). –  Employed Russian Nov 28 '11 at 0:48
    
Currently I'm not limiting the maximum number of threads (since I know how many client requests I'm going to make) so I'm not keeping track of the IDs of each thread which I would need in order to use pthread_join() I believe. However, your explanation made the problem more clear. As my question said, I was thinking of the pthread_exit()in main as making main wait as opposed to exiting main without terminating the other threads. Using pthread_sigmask() to block SIGINT within each thread has fixed the problem. It might ot be te most correct solution but it will do for now. Thanks! –  Matt Nov 28 '11 at 0:49

On Linux, you should not have to reinstall the signal handler, using either signal (which implements BSD semantics by default) or sigaction.

when I hit ctrl-C once but a second time exits the program immediately.

That's not because your handler got reset, but likely because your signal handler is doing something it shouldn't.

Here is how I would debug this issue: run the program under GDB and

(gdb) catch syscall exit
(gdb) catch syscall exit_group
(gdb) run

Now wait a bit for the program to start working, and hit Control-C. That will give you (gdb) prompt. Now continue the program as if it has received SIGINT: signal SIGINT (this will invoke your handler). Repeat the 'Control-C/signal SIGINT' sequence again. If you get stopped in either exit or exit_group system call, see where that is coming from (using GDB where command).

Update:

Given the new code you posted, it's not clear exactly where you call pthread_exit to "ensures that main lets current connections finish before exiting". As written, your main thread will exit the loop on first Control-C, and proceed to call exit which would not wait for other threads to finish.

Either you didn't show your actual code, or the "second Control-C" is a red herring and your first Control-C takes you out already (without finishing work in other threads).

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Sorry, was trying to omit as much of the other program logic as possible and I left it out. There is another pthread_exit() call immediately after the while loop. –  Matt Nov 28 '11 at 0:41

I'm not sure to understand. A signal handler should usually not re-install any signal handler (including itself), because the signal handler stays in function till another is installed. See also SA_NODEFER flag to sigaction to be able to catch the signal during its handling.

A signal handler should be short. See my answer to this question. It usually mostly sets a volatile sig_atomic_t variable.

What is not working? Don't do complex or long-lasting processing inside signal handlers. Please show your code...

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"the signal handler stays in function till another is installed". BSD signal works that way, SysV one doesn't. –  Employed Russian Nov 27 '11 at 20:23
    
But the question is tagged Linux and I am quite sure Linux sigaction works as I am saying. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 27 '11 at 20:26
1  
Yes, sigaction (without SA_RESETHAND) does not require signal to be reset. For signal it depends (see my answer and pointer therein ;-) –  Employed Russian Nov 27 '11 at 20:38
    
I was following info mainly from csl.mtu.edu/cs441/www/NOTES/signal/install.html which mentions reinstalling under "2 Important Notes". I am less familiar with the sigaction method. Will post some more code in a moment. –  Matt Nov 27 '11 at 20:43

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