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I am trying to call a javascript function from an onclick trigger.

html section:

<div class="my_radio">

<input type="radio" name="my_radio" value="1" onclick="my_func()"/>  first button

</div><!-- end of class my_radio -->

And the js/jquery section is :

<script type="text/javascript">

$(document).ready(function(){

function  my_func(){
alert("this is an alert");

}

});

</script>

It does not work.

but if i keep the js function out of the $(document).ready section, it works. Following is the relevant code snippet:

<script type="text/javascript">

$(document).ready(function(){

function  my_func111(){
alert("this is an alert");

}

    });

function  my_func(){
alert("this is an alert");

}


</script>

works.

1) Why does not the first js.jquery code snippet work?

2) How can I get the first js/jquery code snippet working ?

EDIT :

SO FAR AS I KNOW, $(document).ready is executed when the web page loads completely. so how can I prevent my_func to be active before or after the complete page-loading if i write my_func outside $(document).ready?

share|improve this question
    
duplicate question > stackoverflow.com/questions/4242541/… –  Glavić Nov 27 '11 at 18:49
    
2 words: lexical scoping. –  AlienWebguy Nov 27 '11 at 18:50
    
like Alien said > stackoverflow.com/questions/1047454/what-is-lexical-scope –  Glavić Nov 27 '11 at 18:51
    
possible duplicate of How can I make a function defined in jQuery.ready available globally? –  Andy E Nov 27 '11 at 18:54
    
oh let me understand what u said –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's all about javascript execution contexts and scope.

Everything that you define within a function is know only in this function.

In your first test, the function my_func() can only be used within the ready callback (and in the inner other objects). You can't reference it outside.

In your second example, the function my_func() is global to the document and accessible from anywhere.

I recognize this is maybe a verry simple explanation :-)

share|improve this answer
    
simple and right. the necessary and unnoticed thing to me was, everything inside the $(document).ready is defined within a callback function . –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:08

If you define your function within a callback, you can only use it within this callback:

$(document).ready(function(){
  function something(){
    alert('test');
  }

  //..

  something(); // Will work
}

something(); // Won't work
share|improve this answer
    
the necessary and unnoticed thing to me was, everything inside the $(document).ready is defined within a callback function –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:11

Your first snippet doesn't work, because in in the function my_func111 is defined within the local scope of an anonymous function passed as an argument in your $(document).ready call.

You can fix your code by placing the function definition to the document scope and calling it inside ready function such as:

function my_func(){
   alert("this is an alert");    
}

$(document).ready(function(){
   my_func();
});
share|improve this answer
    
what will have for onclick to do then? –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:09
    
Well onclick="my_func()"? –  jsalonen Nov 27 '11 at 20:13
    
Now take your time and read through your answers with patience. They already contain all the information you need to understand and answer your problem! –  jsalonen Nov 27 '11 at 20:20
    
i tried with ur code. the alert box shows up as soon as the page loads. clicking is not required there. –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 28 '11 at 5:32
    
Well obvious if you don't want the alert to appear onload, then remove the my_func() call from $(document).ready? This as far as I will go with my answer. I will leave the rest for you to figure out! –  jsalonen Nov 28 '11 at 9:41

I presume by "it does not work", you mean it says "my_func is not defined" or similar?

When you define a function within a function, the inner function is not visible outside of the outer function (unless it is part of the outer function's return statement).

You'll need to learn about closures, a good tutorial on which can be found here.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, says 'undefined'. ur link says : The site's security certificate is not trusted! answer to my ques 2? getting familiar with closure .. –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:05
    
sorry, i was mistaken in my previous comment to u. does not say anything. –  Istiaque Ahmed Nov 27 '11 at 19:21

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