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I have the following code. When I compile it with the gnu extensions (-std=gnu99), the program will catch 5 SIGINT before ending (which I would expect). When compiled without it (-std=c99) ends after the second (and only outputs one line).

What am I missing?

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int int_stage = 0;
int got_signal = 0;

void sigint(int parameter)
{
  (void)parameter;
  got_signal = 1;
  int_stage++;
}

int main()
{
  signal(SIGINT,sigint);

  while(1)
  {
    if (got_signal)
    {
      got_signal = 0;
      puts("still alive");
      if (int_stage >= 5) exit(1);
    }
  }
  return 0;
}
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You should be using sig_atomic_t, not ints for the signal handling. If I were you I would avoid this whole mess and just use sigwait. –  Lalaland Nov 27 '11 at 19:07
    
@EthanSteinberg Uh? The prototype of the function is void (*func)(int)) according to both C and POSIX. –  Let_Me_Be Nov 27 '11 at 19:10
1  
@Let_Me_Be: I believe Ethan is referring to got_signal, not the parameter to your signal handler. –  Mat Nov 27 '11 at 19:16
    
@Mat Oh, thanks –  Let_Me_Be Nov 27 '11 at 19:27
    
@Let_Me_Be This is with sigwait and no busy waiting ideone.com/6V0No –  Lalaland Nov 27 '11 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use sigaction(2) rather than signal(2).

The Linux man page has this, in particular, in the Portability section:

In the original UNIX systems, when a handler that was established using signal() was invoked by the delivery of a signal, the disposition of the signal would be reset to SIG_DFL, and the system did not block delivery of further instances of the signal. System V also provides these semantics for signal(). This was bad because the signal might be delivered again before the handler had a chance to reestablish itself. Furthermore, rapid deliveries of the same signal could result in recursive invocations of the handler.

BSD improved on this situation by changing the semantics of signal handling (but, unfortunately, silently changed the semantics when establishing a handler with signal()). On BSD, when a signal handler is invoked, the signal disposition is not reset, and further instances of the signal are blocked from being delivered while the handler is executing.

The situation on Linux is as follows:

  • The kernel's signal() system call provides System V semantics.

  • By default, in glibc 2 and later, the signal() wrapper function does not invoke the kernel system call. Instead, it calls sigaction(2) using flags that supply BSD semantics. This default behav‐ ior is provided as long as the _BSD_SOURCE feature test macro is defined. By default, _BSD_SOURCE is defined; it is also implicitly defined if one defines _GNU_SOURCE, and can of course be explic‐ itly defined.
    On glibc 2 and later, if the _BSD_SOURCE feature test macro is not defined, then signal() provides System V semantics. (The default implicit definition of _BSD_SOURCE is not provided if one invokes gcc(1) in one of its standard modes (-std=xxx or -ansi) or defines various other feature test macros such as _POSIX_SOURCE, _XOPEN_SOURCE, or _SVID_SOURCE; see feature_test_macros(7).)

Using std=gnu99, you're getting BSD semantics. Using -std=c99, you're getting System V semantics. So the signal handler is "reinstalled" in one case (BSD), and the signal disposition is reset back to SIG_DFL in the other (System V).

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I agree with Ethan Steinberg - the "busy wait" is So Wrong...

But the problem is that you're failing to reset the signal handler. AFAIK, you must do this (call "signal(SIGINT,sigint)" again) with any version of C.

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The problem is that signal also resets the signal handling mechanism, you have to reset sigint as the signal handler. From the manual

In the original UNIX systems, when a handler that was established using signal() was invoked by the delivery of a signal, the disposition of the signal would be reset to SIG_DFL, and the system did not block delivery of further instances of the signal. System V also provides these semantics for signal(). This was bad because the signal might be delivered again before the handler had a chance to reestablish itself. Furthermore, rapid deliveries of the same signal could result in recursive invocations of the handler.

This is how to do it with the old antiquated signal() call. Note how int_stage and got_signal have to be sig_atomic_t. You can also only call async safe functions, look at here for a list.

#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

sig_atomic_t int_stage = 0;  
sig_atomic_t got_signal = 0;

void sigint(int parameter)
{
  (void)parameter;
  got_signal = 1;
  int_stage++;
}

int main()
{
   signal(SIGINT,sigint);

   while(1)
   {
      if (got_signal)
      {
       signal(SIGINT,sigint);
       got_signal = 0;
       puts("still alive");
       if (int_stage >= 5) exit(1);
    }
 }
 return 0;
}

Please consider either using sigaction, or sigwait.

Sigaction would have practically the same idea, but no nonsense with re-initializing the signal handler. Sigwait would stop your thread until a signal is received. So, for sigwait, you can call any function or deal with any data. I can show you example code if you desire.

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