Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

NULL appears to be zero in my GCC test programs, but wikipedia says that NULL is only required to point to unaddressable memory.

Do any compilers make NULL non-zero? I'm curious whether if (ptr == NULL) is better practice than if (!ptr).

share|improve this question
2  
c-faq.com/null/machexamp.html –  Nate C-K Nov 30 '11 at 0:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted

NULL is guaranteed to be zero, perhaps casted to (void *)1.

C99, §6.3.2.3, ¶3

An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant.(55) If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function.

And note 55 says:

55) The macro NULL is defined in <stddef.h> (and other headers) as a null pointer constant.

Notice that, because of how the rules for null pointers are formulated, the value you use to assign/compare null pointers is guaranteed to be zero, but the bit pattern actually stored inside the pointer can be any other thing (but AFAIK only few very esoteric platforms exploited this fact, and this should not be a problem anyway since to "see" the underlying bit pattern you should go into UB-land anyway).


So, as far as the standard is concerned, the two forms are equivalent (!ptr is equivalent to ptr==0 due to §6.5.3.3 ¶5, and ptr==0 is equivalent to ptr==NULL); if(!ptr) is also quite idiomatic.

That being said, I usually write explicitly if(ptr==NULL) instead of if(!ptr) to make it extra clear that I'm checking a pointer for nullity instead of some boolean value.


  1. Notice that in C++ the void * cast cannot be present due to the stricter implicit casting rules that would make the usage of such NULL cumbersome (you would have to explicitly convert it to the compared pointer's type every time).
share|improve this answer
7  
However, the bytes in a null pointer are not required to be zeros. –  aschepler Nov 27 '11 at 19:57
4  
@aschepler: and what did I write in my answer? –  Matteo Italia Nov 27 '11 at 19:58
1  
comment was on an older revision. nice answer. –  aschepler Nov 27 '11 at 20:05
9  
The most important point to take home: void *p; memset(&p, 0, sizeof p); does not make p a NULL pointer. –  Simon Richter Nov 28 '11 at 12:37
3  
@SimonRichter: It doesn't necessarily make p a null pointer. (It very likely does on most systems, but depending on it makes your code non-portable.) –  Keith Thompson Nov 30 '11 at 5:32

From the language standard:

6.3.2.3 Pointers
...
3 An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant.55) If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function.
...
55) The macro NULL is defined in <stddef.h> (and other headers) as a null pointer constant; see 7.17.

Given that language, the macro NULL should evaluate to a zero-valued expression (either an undecorated literal 0, an expression like (void *) 0, or another macro or expression that ultimately evaluates to 0). The expressions ptr == NULL and !ptr should be equivalent. The second form tends to be more idiomatic C code.

Note that the null pointer value doesn't have to be 0. The underlying implementation may use any value it wants to represent a null pointer. As far as your source code is concerned, however, a zero-valued pointer expression represents a null pointer.

share|improve this answer

In practice is the same, but NULL is different to zero. Since zero means there's a value and NULL means there isn't any. So, theoretically they are different, NULL having a different meaning and in some cases that difference should be of some use.

share|improve this answer
    
discerning! And, how true! –  Kris Nov 28 '11 at 12:34
2  
Close, but not quite accurate. 0 is a value of type int. NULL is a value of pointer type. (Even that's imprecise; NULL is a macro that expands to a null pointer constant, which yields a null pointer when converted to a pointer type.) –  Keith Thompson Nov 30 '11 at 15:52

in practice no, !ptr is correct

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.