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We are creating a peer to peer program (in c), and we are using multiple threads so that the program can listen for new connections and receive/send data as well.

The problem is, I remember my prof telling us that if you have multiple threads running on the same process, if one has to wait for user input, the entire process is "halted" so none of the other threads will keep running.

But then we have been reading up, and it seems like if one thread is waiting on input, the others keep running as usual...

Which one is right? If we have the program waiting for user input (ya know, things like connect to X or send X a message) on one thread, and another thread just sitting there in an infinite loop waiting for a peer to try to connect, will it still be listening for connections?

thanks! hopefully this makes sense...threads are just so confusing :(

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, on majority of contemporary operating systems multiple threads within one process can be waiting for input (from stdin, from sockets, etc.) while other can be working.

Consider your browser. While you surf the Internet the user interface does not freeze when you wait for a page to load (i.e. one of browser's threads is waiting for the input from a socket connected to a remote host).

(...) and another thread just sitting there in an infinite loop waiting for a peer to try to connect (...)

That's called busy waiting and it's considered a bad practice. Take a look at select(2), epoll(4) or related mechanisms instead.

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The problem is, I remember my prof telling us that if you have multiple threads running on the same process, if one has to wait for user input, the entire process is "halted" so none of the other threads will keep running.

Either you remember wrong, or your professor hasn't actually tried this.

The thread waiting for input is blocked. Other threads continue to run fine.

...just sitting there in an infinite loop waiting for a peer to try to connect...

No! Please don't use polling loops in multithreaded code! Your thread 'waiting for a peer to connect' is more likely waiting on a Seamphore or Event to be signalled. No polling involved- it's simply no able to run until the semaphore is signalled.

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You very probably need to learn about multiplexing functions like poll (or select, pselect, ppoll) which are able to wait for input.

And of course, if one thread is waiting for I/O, other threads are happily able to run (unless a mutex or some other thing is blocking them, see e.g.pthread_mutex_lock).

This is at least true on Linux, where threads are kernel entities (the kernel scheduler deal with tasks, which are threads). See the Linux specific clone syscall - used by the thread library.

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In Unix/Linux, you can also use the select() system call to handle i/o for multiple file descriptors (like sockets, pipes, ...).

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If one thread is suspended, the others keep on executing (that's somewhat the main reason for having threads!).

However, you should not execute an infinite loop in a thread - this wastes to much processor power. Instead, use a blocking function. A blocking function is a function that returns as soon as it can do what it should do or if an error occurs. While such a blocking function waits for whatever it has to do, it does not consume any processor time.

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