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If I have a #define GAMENAME "POSEIDON" and would like to cast it over to either a LPCSTR or std::string how would I go about doing it 'properly'?

Fx:

m_hwnd = CreateWindowEx(NULL,
    "GLClass",

    /* My GAMENAME #define goes here */
    (LPCSTR)GAMENAME,

    dwStyle | WS_CLIPCHILDREN |
    WS_CLIPSIBLINGS,
    /* The X,Y coordinate */
    0, 0,
    m_windowRect.right - m_windowRect.left,
    m_windowRect.bottom - m_windowRect.top,
    /* TODO: Handle to Parent */
    NULL,
    /* TODO: Handle to Menu */
    NULL,
    m_hinstance,
    this);

Perhaps I am just taking a bad approach to this?

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How do you use it as std::string? –  KennyTM Nov 27 '11 at 20:37
    
std::string thisString = GAMEWORLD; class->member(thisString.str()); I can get it cast over to a LPCSTR in the define using: #define GAMENAME ((LPCSTR)"POSEIDON") but I'd like it to be generic in the #define –  krslynx Nov 27 '11 at 20:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

#defines are processed by the preprocessor so GAMENAME is not really a variable in your program. Use of casts as demonstrated the answer to your own question would seem to make the problem worse. Mike Dunn's second article on strings at Code Project explains why casts are not the best option. The first article is also worth reading obviously.

You should be able to create a std::string like this:

std::string str = "char string";

Then create the LPCSTR from it:

LPCSTR psz = str.c_str();

In your program you would pass psz to CreateWindowEx(). Another thing worth thinking about is whether the game name really needs to change? If not it's better making this a constant.

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// Instead of a macro use a template called 'GAMENAME'.
template <typename T> T GAMENAME() { return T("POSEIDON"); };

Example use:

GAMENAME<LPCSTR>();
GAMENAME<std::string>();

Hope this helps.

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#defines are simply used by the preprocessor to do a search and replace of the defined tokens used in the source code. So anywhere that you have GAMENAME that will be literally replaced with "POSEIDON" before the compiler even runs against your source code.

Really though, in C++ the best thing to use would be a static const variable. This will give your code much more descriptive meaning while avoiding the pitfalls of preprocessor macros. The biggest "downside" of this is that you have to place your static (non-integral) definitions in a translation unit as well as the header file:

// my_class.h
class MyClass {
public:
    static const char *kGameName;

    MyClass(const RECTANGLE &rect) m_windowRect(rect) {
        CreateWindow();
    }

private:
    HANDLE m_hwnd;
    RECTANGLE m_windowRect;
    HINSTANCE m_hinstance;
};

// my_class.cpp
const char *MyClass::kGameName = "POSEIDON";

void MyClass::CreateWindow() {
    m_hwnd = CreateWindowEx(NULL,
        "GLClass",

        /* My GAMENAME constant is used here */
        kGameName,

        dwStyle | WS_CLIPCHILDREN |
        WS_CLIPSIBLINGS,
        /* The X,Y coordinate */
        0, 0,
        m_windowRect.right - m_windowRect.left,
        m_windowRect.bottom - m_windowRect.top,
        /* TODO: Handle to Parent */
        NULL,
        /* TODO: Handle to Menu */
        NULL,
        m_hinstance,
        this);
}

If you want to use std::string just replace that where I used char * and use kGameName.c_str() in the CreateWindowEX call.

By the way, LPCSTR is basically just a #DEFINE LPCSTR const char*

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LPCSTR = Long Pointer to Constant STRing, which is defined as a const char* (ie. a C-string). "POSEIDON" is a string literal and is of type const char* (ie. LPCSTR).

  1. You could leave it as is and then when you need an std::string construct one like:

    std::string myString(GAMENAME);
    

    Or create a temporary std::string object (if an std::string isn't automatically constructed from a char* when it's needed):

    std::string(GAMENAME)
    
  2. You could have a const std::string GAMENAME = "POSEIDON"; and then wherever you need an LPCSTR you use the one returned by GAMENAME.c_str().

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