Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this code here, which is intended to allow any type of arguments:

public static void AreEqual(object expectedValue, object actualValue) {
	if (expectedValue == actualValue) {
		HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Equal");
	} else {
		HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Not Equal");
	}
}

If I call it using a couple of ints it does not behave very well.

AreEqual(3, 3)   // prints Not Equal
share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

At the simplest level:

public static void AreEqual(object expectedValue, object actualValue) {
    if (object.Equals(expectedValue,actualValue)) {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Equal");
    } else {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Not Equal");
    }
}

Or with generics (supports IEquatable<T>):

public static void AreEqual<T>(T expectedValue, T actualValue) {
    if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(expectedValue,actualValue)) {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Equal");
    } else {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Not Equal");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the generic alternative – Peter Lillevold May 6 '09 at 10:04
    
so does that mean you get like 10 populist badges at once? lol – Chad Grant May 6 '09 at 10:05
    
I don't have any populist badges ;-(. The "other" answer needs to be +10 too, I believe. So I guess you need +22 or someting! – Marc Gravell May 6 '09 at 10:14

Just to highlight the reason for the "strange" behavior is because when you cast an int to object boxing occurs. The two 3s are converted to objects and then you are not comparing numbers anymore, you are comparing references, which will not be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 sarnath'd (why oh why 15 characters?) – annakata May 6 '09 at 10:15

To check if the two object values are equal use this:

if (Object.Equals(expectedValue, actualValue)) {

As the normal == operator assumes an object is a reference type (despite the fact that value types also descend from objects).

share|improve this answer
2  
I see what you did thar – Chad Grant May 6 '09 at 10:03
    
Why change the accepted answer then? =) – J. Steen May 6 '09 at 10:07
    
Why NOT change the accepted answer then, rather? ;) – J. Steen May 6 '09 at 10:07
    
There is no 'normal == operator'. In your method you've told the compiler to treat your arguments as the base object type. When you pass value types into your method, the value type is boxed and the object == operator does compare as references. Both 3's are boxed to different objects, and a reference equality check does correctly indicate the references are not equal. – Robert Paulson May 6 '09 at 10:17
    
You do not need to add the type prefix, Equals is good enough :) – leppie May 6 '09 at 10:21

Try:

if (expectedValue.Equals(actualValue))

and of course you need to handle null, so you should try this:

Boolean eq = false;
if (expectedValue == null || actualValue == null)
    eq = (expectedValue == actualValue);
else
    eq = expectedValue.Equals(actualValue);

if (eq) {
    HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Equal");
} else {
    HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Not Equal");
}

This is of course the same as @mike nelson's answer:

if (Object.Equals(expectedValue, actualValue))

so go upvote his answer.

share|improve this answer
if (expectedValue != null)
{
    if (expectedValue.Equals(actualValue))
    {
        // enter code here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is a bad idea... what if expectedValue==null? – Marc Gravell May 6 '09 at 10:00
    
This must be the fastest downvoted accepted answer I've seen so far :) – Peter Lillevold May 6 '09 at 10:05
    
Sorry guys, I'll edit it.. I answered it too fast. – Jean Azzopardi May 6 '09 at 10:08
    
So happy I am sober and didn't accidentally leave a wrong answer on this one. wow – Chad Grant May 6 '09 at 10:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.