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I'm new to C and I'm reading "The C Programming Language" by K&R to learn it. I had a question about this example function appearing on pg 109 of the 2nd edition:

/* readlines:  read input lines */
int readlines(char *lineptr[], int maxlines)
{
   int len, nlines;
   char *p, line[MAXLEN];
   nlines = 0;
   while ((len = getline(line, MAXLEN)) > 0)
       if (nlines >= maxlines || p = alloc(len) == NULL)
           return -1;
       else {
           line[len-1] = '\0';  /* delete newline */
           strcpy(p, line);
           lineptr[nlines++] = p;
       }
   return nlines;
}

I was wondering why *p is at all necessary here? p is allocated memory and then line is copied into it. Why can't just line be used, so at the end lineptr[nlines++] = p could be replaced by lineptr[nlines++] = line.

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Is this homework? :) –  Jonathan Grynspan Nov 27 '11 at 21:59
    
No, self learning. I'm learning C so that I can get better as a programmer.. manual memory allocation is new to me as are many low-level c concept –  babonk Nov 27 '11 at 22:00
    
Thanks all for the answers. I get it now. Was used to the easy world of PHP where you could pass strings by value with ease –  babonk Nov 27 '11 at 22:09
    
Are you not missing a pair of parentheses in the if condition? If your compiler is not warning about the odd assignment, you haven't got enough warning flags set. The line should read: if (nlines >= maxlines || (p = alloc(len)) == NULL); my copy of K&R2 (with the tag 'Based on Draft Proposed ANSI C') does have the extra parentheses. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 27 '11 at 22:33
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't allocate memory for each line, you'll end up with lineptr being an array full of pointers to just the last line you read (not to mention to stack memory which is likely to be overwritten). Allocating memory for each line as you read makes the returned array make sense. As an example, let's say that line happens to get allocated on the stack at address 0x1000. If you make your suggested change, the resulting lineptr array for an 8 line file would be:

0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000, 0x1000

Yowch! Allocating memory for each line as you read it, and then copying the line into that allocated memory is the only solution.

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lineptr[nlines++] = line;

would fill lineptr with pointers to memory that is local to that function, and that memory becomes invalid as soon as the function returns. The values of all the elements of the lineptr array would all be identical and equal to line.

So the allocation is necessary here. You really need to copy the contents of line into a newly allocated memory location that persists after the function has returns.

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You'd need storage for each line to be allocated somewhere. You can't just capture the value of line as you suggest because that is a local variable which will be out of scope after the function returns (and in this particular example, it's overwritten on each iteration).

You could avoid having line by doing getline directly into the elements of lineptr (which you would allocate as you go), but you cannot get rid of p.

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A new chunk of memory needs to be allocated for each line. The pointer p is the only handle we have to that memory. We assign lineptr[nlines++] = p so we can reference each chunk of memory (e.g. line) as part of the array lineptr.

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An assignment of the kind lineptr[nlines++] = p in c/c++, sets the address of lineptr[nlines++] to the address where p points to, no data is copied here.

so, the address of line is always the same address; so lineptr[nlines++] = line whould mean that all all lineptr[i] would point to the same address. the worst part, after the function returns, line does no longer exist, so every lineptr[i] then points to some invalid address.

using the p allocates new memory for each line, and ensures that the address of that memory is still valid between functions (until you free it).

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Okay so let's show you how to do the same thing without char *p... I am going to slightly modify the code.

/* readlines: read input lines */

#include <string.h>

/* put that include line below #include if you don't already have this string.h defines strdup() function which we use below */

int readlines(char *lineptr[], int maxlines)
{
   int len, nlines;
   char line[MAXLEN];
   nlines = 0;

   while ((len = getline(line, MAXLEN)) > 0) {
           line[len-1] = '\0';  /* delete newline */
           lineptr[nlines] = strdup(line); /* allocate memory and make a copy */
           if (lineptr[nlines] == NULL) {
                  return -1;
           }

           nlines++;

           if (nlines >= marlines) 
               break;


       }
   }

   return nlines;
}

This code is closest without the temporary char *p use.

The thing is that while this is functionally correct, use of the temporary variable char *p to test out all allocations and retrieval makes the code cleaner to read, easy to follow for teaching purposes. It also shows explicitly the allocation of the string memory as a separate step, which is hidden in strdup.

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1  
you forgot about the nlines >= maxlines check! –  esskar Nov 27 '11 at 22:36
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