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So I have a base class Animal which has 2 classes inheriting from it, which are cat and dog. Both classes are redefining a pure virtual method speak which just couts "meow" for cat and "woof" for dog. In in my main function I want to be able to do some thing like this:

int main (void) {
  Animal a;
  dog d;

  while (cin  >> a) //is this even possible? would it be cin >> d; instead?
   cout << a << endl;



  return(0);
}

SO this should cout the animals speak function, but how can I go about doing so? Also, I'm confused, if you dont know the type of animal the user is going to cin then how can you determine which speak function to use, would you use a template class?

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8  
Have you tried... anything? –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 22:18
    
If your Animal class contains a pure virtual function, then you can't do Animal a; in the first place. –  jrok Nov 27 '11 at 22:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do something like this in base class:

#include <istream>

using namespace std;

class Animal
{
  friend istream & operator >> ( istream &is, Animal &animal )
  {
    animal.readFromStream(is);
    return is;
  };
protected:
  virtual void readFromStream( istream &is ) = 0;
};

and in derived:

class Dog : public Animal
{
  protected:
    virtual void readFromStream( istream &is )
    {
      // read dog
    };
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice and to the point. You can even return is; for brevity if you change the return type. –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 22:38
    
but how to load the cat with cin >> a where a is just an Animal? (see original post) –  esskar Nov 27 '11 at 22:39
    
I will give this a go! –  cody Nov 27 '11 at 22:50
    
@esskar: in this case animal should have a virtual constructor (based on the read stream): static Animal * VirtConstructor( istream &is ) { /* generate class based on the stream, or return 0 */ }; –  Naszta Nov 28 '11 at 9:52
    
What would go inside readFromStream? Atm I'm doing something like is >> "dog"; but I get a load of errors about >> not being overloaded, but wasnt it already overloaded in the base class. All I want to do is be able to type dog(10, 20) as an input, where 10 is its age and 20 its weight in its constructor, and the cmd should output speak(). This input/output stream stuff is going way over my head. –  cody Dec 1 '11 at 20:21

Here's an example of overriding operator<<, which calls a public member function speak(). If you need access to private members in the overloaded operator<<, make it a friend.

#include <iostream>

class Animal {
   public:
      virtual std::string speak(void) = 0;
};

class Dog : public Animal {
   std::string speak() { return "woof"; }
};

class Cat : public Animal {
   std::string speak() { return "meow"; }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, Animal& a) {
    out << a.speak();
    return out;
}

int main (void) {
   Dog d;
   Cat c;

   Animal &a = d;
   std::cout << a << std::endl;

   Animal &a2 = c;
   std::cout << a2 << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

You should be able to work out how to do similar for operator>>.

Also, I'm confused, if you dont know the type of animal the user is going to cin then how can you determine which speak function to use, would you use a template class?

That's the idea behind dynamic binding/polymorphism. a and a2 are references to derived types of Animal and, since speak() is virtual, the v-table will contain a pointer to the necessary speak() function for a Dog or Cat object.

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"You should be able to work out how to do similar for operator<<." Typo? Did you mean operator>> ? –  Robᵩ Nov 27 '11 at 22:42
    
@Rob: woops, I had the other two the wrong way around as well in the paragraph up the top before I quickly edited it. At least I got the ones in the code right. –  AusCBloke Nov 27 '11 at 22:45

You can't do precisely what you want. That is, you can't

Animal a;
std::cin >> a;

and expect the type of 'a' to change. Fundamentally, objects are not polymorphic -- pointers and references are polymorphic.

Knowing that, you can do something almost like what you want:

Animal* pA;
std::cin >> pA;
std::cout << *pA << "\n";
delete pA;

You can accomplish this by overloading

istream& operator>>(istream&, Animal*&);

to create (via new) an object of the run-time indicated type.

Consider this program:

#include <iostream>
class Animal {
public:
  virtual void speak(std::ostream& os) const = 0;
  virtual ~Animal() {} // must be virtual
};
class Dog : public Animal {
public:
  void speak(std::ostream& os) const { os << "woof"; }
};
class Cat : public Animal {
public:
  void speak(std::ostream& os) const { os << "meow"; }
};
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Animal& being) {
  being.speak(os);
  return os;
}

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Animal*& zygote) {
  std::string species;
  is >> species;

  // fetch remainder of line with std::getline()

  if(species == "cat") {
    // parse remainder of line

    // Finally, create a Cat
    zygote = new Cat;
    return is;
  }
  if(species == "dog") {
    // parse remainder of line

    // and create a Dog
    zygote = new Dog;
    return is;
  }

  // Hmm, unknown species? Probably not safe to create
  std::cerr << "Warning! Unknown species. Could be dangerous!\n";
  is.setstate(std::ios::failbit);
  zygote = 0;
  return is;
}

int main () {
  Animal *pPet;

  while(std::cin >> pPet) {
    std::cout << *pPet << "\n";
    delete pPet;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to work, but is there a way I can do something like: std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Animal*& zygote) { (zygote)->readFromStream( istream &is ) } Then it should call the readFromStream automatically for a type dog or cat? Then I can just create a dog object with its constructor through input stream and then it should do speak()? Currently all I get is "segment fault" from the compiler. –  cody Dec 1 '11 at 22:58

for the << operator, it is kinda okay

friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &output, const Animal & animal)     //output
{
    return output << animal.speak();
} 

for the input it is more complex, and i do not know if you can do it directly with Animal but you could build an AnimalLoader

class AnimalLoader {
    Animal* _animal;

public:
    AnimalLoader() : _animal(NULL) { }

    ~AnimalLoader() { if(_animal) delete _animal; }

    Animal *GetAnimal() 
    {
        Animal *retval = _animal;
        _animal = NULL;
        return retval; 
    }

    friend istream & operator >> ( istream &input, AnimalLoader &animalLoader )
    {
        if(_animal) delete _animal;
        std::string animalStr;
        input >> animalStr;
        if(animalStr == "dog")
            _animal = new Dog();
        else if(animalStr == "cat")
           _animal = new Cat();
        else
           _animal = NULL;

        return input;
    }
};

so you can then call

int main (void) {
    AnimalLoader animalLoader;

    while (cin  >> animalLoader) {
        Animal *animal = animalLoader.GetAnimal();
        if(animal != NULL) {
             cout << *animal << endl;
             delete animal;
        }
        else {
             cout << "ERROR: Could not read Animal." << endl;   
        }
    }
    return(0);
}

EDIT 1 forgot to call speak()

EDIT 2 applied it to OP example

share|improve this answer
    
This is a terrible answer, on both counts. The first part is flat out broken (happy recursion), and the second needlessly creates tons of dynamic objects that are promptly leaked. –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 22:37
    
forgot to call speak() fixed it. why is the 2nd one leaking anything? the OP asked, if it is possible to read-in an Animal without knowing which animal to read; so he does need an AnimalLoader (in my opinion). –  esskar Nov 27 '11 at 22:45

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