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Is there a way to toggle a read-only mode so when you click any object in your window it simply returns what you clicked, ignoring the object's usual event handling? IE, while in this "read-only" mode, if you click on a Button, it simply returns the button, not actually pressing the button. Then I could do something like:

if ("thing pressed" == button) "do this";
else if ("thing pressed" == panel) "do that";
else "do nothing";

Here's my code, its a frame with 3 colored boxes. Clicking the 2nd box, the 3rd box, or the background will display a message. Clicking box 1 does nothing. I like using new mouse adapters so I want to do it this way.

Now what I want is when you click box 1, box 1 is treated as selected (if that helps you get the picture). Then if you click anywhere, including box 1 again, box 1 is deselected and nothing else (meaning that box 2, box 3. or the background's message will display). At that time, only if box 2 or 3 were clicked, they will still not display their normal message but a different message would be displayed.

I'm very sorry if I come off a little short.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Labels {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Labels();
    }

    Square l1, l2, l3;
    public Labels() {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        l1 = new Square();
        l2 = new Square();
        l3 = new Square();

        frame.setVisible(true);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setSize(120, 150);
        frame.setResizable(false);

        panel.setVisible(true);
        panel.setLayout(null);
        l1.setLocation(5, 5);
        l2.setLocation(5, 60);
        l3.setLocation(60, 5);

        l2.setColor("yellow");
        l3.setColor("black");

        l1.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                //do nothing
            }
        });

        l2.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                System.out.println("Pushed label 2");
            }
        });
        l3.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                System.out.println("Pushed label 3");
            }
        });
        panel.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                System.out.println("pushed background");
            }
        });

        frame.add(panel);
        panel.add(l1);
        panel.add(l2);
        panel.add(l3);
    }

    class Square extends JLabel{
        Color color = Color.blue;

        public Square() {
            // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub\
            setVisible(true);
            setSize(50,50);
        }

        public void paint(Graphics g) {
            super.paint(g);
            g.setColor(color);
            g.fillRect(0, 0, 50, 50);
        }
        public void setColor(String color){
            if (color == "white") this.color = Color.white;
            else if (color == "black") this.color = Color.black;
            else if (color == "yellow") this.color = Color.yellow;
            else {
                System.out.println("Invalid color");
                return;
            }
            repaint();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You'll not want to use == to check for String equality. It may work here, but it often does fail as == checks whether one object is one and the same as another (which you don't care about here), not whether two Strings have the same characters in the same order (which you do care about). So instead use equals(...) or equalsIgnoreCase(...). –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 18:15
    
Also, you'll not want to call setVisible(true) on your JFrame until after adding all components (the end of your Labels constructor would be a nice place for this for instance), to make sure that all added components are displayed. And you'll want to get rid of most of all the other calls to setVisible(true) sprinkled throughout your code. They're really not necessary. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 18:16
    
Finally you'll want to study Vash's recommendations (as I'm doing!) to see an elegant way to monitor the state of your components in a very nice object oriented way. That's what I love about these forums, there's always something great to learn such as what is posted in his answer. Great stuff! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 18:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't disable anything. Simply change the state of your class, perhaps by using a few boolean flag variables/fields and change these flags depending on what is pressed.

So have boolean fields called label1PressedLast, label2PressedLast, and label3PressedLast or something similar, and when a label is pressed, check the states of all other flags and have your program's behavior change depending on the state of these flags and the label that was just pressed. Then set all flags to false except for the one corresponding to the label that was just pressed.

For example, this little program reacts only if the first and then the third JLabel have been pressed:

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.awt.event.MouseListener;

import javax.swing.*;

public class FlagEg extends JPanel {
   private static final int LABEL_COUNT = 3;
   private JLabel[] labels = new JLabel[LABEL_COUNT];
   private boolean[] flags = new boolean[LABEL_COUNT];

   public FlagEg() {
      setLayout(new GridLayout(1, 0, 20, 0));
      setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(15, 15, 15, 15));

      // panel mouse listener
      addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
         @Override
         public void mousePressed(MouseEvent arg0) {
            inactivateAll();
         }
      });

      MouseListener labelsMouseListener = new MouseAdapter() {
         @Override
         public void mousePressed(MouseEvent mouseEvt) {
            myMousePressed(mouseEvt);
         }
      };

      // create JLabels and add MouseListener
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         labels[i] = new JLabel("Label " + (i + 1));
         labels[i].addMouseListener(labelsMouseListener);
         labels[i].setOpaque(true);
         labels[i].setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black));
         add(labels[i]);
      }
   }

   private void inactivateAll() {
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         labels[i].setBackground(null);
         flags[i] = false;
      }
   }

   private void myMousePressed(MouseEvent mouseEvt) {
      JLabel label = (JLabel) mouseEvt.getSource();

      // which label was pressed?
      int index = -1;
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         if (label == labels[i]) {
            index = i;
         }
      }

      // check if first label and then third pressed:
      if (flags[0] && index == 2) {
         System.out.println("first and then third label pressed!");
      }

      // reset all labels and flags to initial state
      inactivateAll();

      // set pressed label background color and set flag of label just pressed
      labels[index].setBackground(Color.pink);
      flags[index] = true;

   }

   private static void createAndShowGui() {
      FlagEg mainPanel = new FlagEg();

      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Flag Example");
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.getContentPane().add(mainPanel);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowGui();
         }
      });
   }
}

Logic iteration two: only label 1 is the "primer" JLabel. This is actually easier to implement, because now you only need one boolean flag, that representing label 1 being pressed:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
public class FlagEg2 extends JPanel {
   private static final int LABEL_COUNT = 3;
   private JLabel[] labels = new JLabel[LABEL_COUNT];

   private boolean label1Flag = false;

   public FlagEg2() {
      setLayout(new GridLayout(1, 0, 20, 0));
      setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(15, 15, 15, 15));

      // panel mouse listener
      addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
         @Override
         public void mousePressed(MouseEvent arg0) {
            inactivateAll();
         }
      });

      MouseListener labelsMouseListener = new MouseAdapter() {
         @Override
         public void mousePressed(MouseEvent mouseEvt) {
            myMousePressed(mouseEvt);
         }
      };

      // create JLabels and add MouseListener
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         labels[i] = new JLabel("Label " + (i + 1));
         labels[i].addMouseListener(labelsMouseListener);
         labels[i].setOpaque(true);
         labels[i].setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black));
         add(labels[i]);
      }
   }

   private void inactivateAll() {
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         labels[i].setBackground(null);
         label1Flag = false;
      }
   }

   private void myMousePressed(MouseEvent mouseEvt) {
      JLabel label = (JLabel) mouseEvt.getSource();

      // which label was pressed?
      int index = -1;
      for (int i = 0; i < labels.length; i++) {
         if (label == labels[i]) {
            index = i;
         }
      }

      if (label1Flag) {
         if (index == 1) {
            System.out.println("Label 1 and label 2 pressed");
         } else if (index == 2) {
            System.out.println("Label 1 and label 3 pressed");
         }

      }

      // reset all labels and flags to initial state
      inactivateAll();

      // if label1, then activate it
      if (index == 0) {
         labels[0].setBackground(Color.pink);
         label1Flag = true;
      }

   }

   private static void createAndShowGui() {
      FlagEg2 mainPanel = new FlagEg2();

      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Flag Example");
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.getContentPane().add(mainPanel);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowGui();
         }
      });
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Booleans would be how I disable, I should have said that. This is the way I will probably do this if I can't find a better way =[. My problem with this method is I would have to add the check to every listener (I believe), and then for each time I want to do this. This is pretty far from dynamic xD –  Jeremy Nov 28 '11 at 1:01
    
No. Again, don't disable anything! How can I be clearer on this point? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 1:08
    
I would appreciate it if you tried to understand me before talking ot me that way. I don't know why you're taking it so literally, I pretty much HAVE TO disable in one way or another, not literally, but the effect I want is as if the listeners were disabled. disable the normal function of the listeners. not have the listeners do what they usually do when they are clicked. how can I be clearer on this point? –  Jeremy Nov 28 '11 at 1:18
    
@Jeremy: please see and run the code I've added. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 1:21
1  
No you do not need to disable anything. All you have to do is give your program some smarts. Seriously. Again, look at the code. All JLabels use the same MouseListener, and none of the mouse listener code is being disabled. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 1:22
package javaapplication6;

import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.awt.event.MouseListener;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

/**
 *
 * @author Jan Vorcak <vorcak@mail.muni.cz>
 */
public class Main {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        MouseListener listener = new MouseAdapter() {

            private int count = 0;

            @Override
            public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                if(e.getComponent() instanceof JLabel) {
                    count++;
                    if (count >= 2) {
                        System.out.println("clicked 2 times on labels");
                        count = 0;
                    }
                } else {
                    count = 0;
                }
            }

        };

        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        JLabel l1 = new JLabel("Label 1");
        JLabel l2 = new JLabel("Label 2");
        JLabel l3 = new JLabel("Label 3");
        l1.addMouseListener(listener);
        l2.addMouseListener(listener);
        l3.addMouseListener(listener);
        frame.addMouseListener(listener); // or panel.addMouseListener(listener);
        panel.add(l1);
        panel.add(l2);
        panel.add(l3);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this isn't quite what I was looking for but that's most likely my fault for explaining it poorly. I appreciate it though. –  Jeremy Nov 28 '11 at 0:59
    
doubleclick counter +1 –  mKorbel Nov 28 '11 at 6:17

You could want to create a listener that do the job for using the putClientProperty method of JComponent.

   public class JComponentClickCountListener extends MouseAdapter {

        private final Integer ONE = 1;

        @Override
        public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
            if (e.getComponent() instanceof JComponent) {

                JComponent jComponent = (JComponent) e.getComponent();

                Object property = jComponent.getClientProperty(JComponentClickCountListener.class);

                if (property instanceof Number) {
                    property = ONE + ((Number) property).intValue();
                }
                else {
                    property = ONE;
                }

                jComponent.putClientProperty(JComponentClickCountListener.class, property);
            }

        }

    }

Then in your code you can decide to have a single instace of that class for all of your components or create a new one each time.

This could give you the advantage of using the propertyChangeListener for future actions.

PS.

The code example do not represent all logic for OP question but i could by used as solid base. Later on i will try to update it. To cover that.

EDIT2:

I think that you should separate the logic, of selection and action over selected items. Then the task is divided into two tasks. First is the possibility to store the information about it state, clicked active, clicked again inactive. The second tasks it to operate on that status when a jComponent status was changed.

This is an simple example that i wrote, the functionality is to highlight the background of labels when the are selected and remove it when it was clicked again or the panel was clicked remove all selections.

This example is divided to three elements Enum, Iterface and class that manage the logic of selection

Enum - we store the possible statuses and a property key.

public enum JComponentActivationStatus {
    NONE,
    ACTIVE,
    INACTIVE;

    public static final String PROPERTY_KEY = JComponentActivationStatus.class.getCanonicalName();
}

Interface - provide a delegate for action to be taken when jcomponenet status change.

public abstract interface JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<T extends JComponent> {

    public abstract void onActivation(T object);

    public abstract void onDeactivation(T object);

}

Class - This class mange the status logic of jcomponents.

import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent;
import java.beans.PropertyChangeListener;

import javax.swing.JComponent;



public class JComponenetActivationManager {



    public static <T extends JComponent> T addMouseStatusControl(T jComponent) {

        jComponent.addMouseListener(new JComponentMouseStatusModyfier());

        return jComponent;
    }

    public static <T extends JComponent> T addActivationStatusChangeAction(T jComponenet, JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<T> statusChangeAction) {

        jComponenet.addPropertyChangeListener(craeteJCompositeActivationStatusChangeListener(statusChangeAction));

        return jComponenet;

    }

    public static  <T extends JComponent> PropertyChangeListener craeteJCompositeActivationStatusChangeListener(JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<T> action) {

        return new JComponentStatusPropertyChangeListener<T>(action);

    }


    /**
     * Class that set the status for the JComponet after doubClicl
     */
    private final static class JComponentMouseStatusModyfier extends MouseAdapter {

        @Override
        public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {

            if(e.getComponent() instanceof JComponent) {

                JComponent jComponent = (JComponent) e.getComponent();

                Object propertyValue = jComponent.getClientProperty(JComponentActivationStatus.PROPERTY_KEY);

                if(JComponentActivationStatus.ACTIVE.equals(propertyValue)) { //We check that the ACTIVE status is already selected, if so we inactive. 
                    propertyValue = JComponentActivationStatus.INACTIVE; //If so we inactive it. 
                } else {
                    propertyValue = JComponentActivationStatus.ACTIVE; // Otherwise we set it as active
                }

                jComponent.putClientProperty(JComponentActivationStatus.PROPERTY_KEY, propertyValue); // We use the property key form status

            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Help class that fire the actions after status is changed 
     */
    private static final class JComponentStatusPropertyChangeListener<T extends JComponent> implements PropertyChangeListener {

        private final JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<T> statusChangeAction;

        /**
         * 
         */
        public JComponentStatusPropertyChangeListener(JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<T> statusChangeAction) {

            if(statusChangeAction == null) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("action can not be null at this point");
            }

            this.statusChangeAction = statusChangeAction;
        }

        @Override
        public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {

            if(JComponentActivationStatus.PROPERTY_KEY.equals(evt.getPropertyName())) {

                if(JComponentActivationStatus.ACTIVE.equals(evt.getNewValue())) {
                    statusChangeAction.onActivation((T) evt.getSource());
                }

                if(JComponentActivationStatus.INACTIVE.equals(evt.getNewValue())){
                    statusChangeAction.onDeactivation((T) evt.getSource());
                }
            }
        }

    }
}

That class contain two public static method, that allow the developer to add the functionality to mange status to any jComponent object, add subscribe the action handler if any change occur.

At the end we have the main method that test our solution

public static void main(String[] args) {

        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
            JLabel l1 = new JLabel("Label 1");
            JLabel l2 = new JLabel("Label 2");
            JLabel l3 = new JLabel("Label 3");

        panel.setBackground(Color.CYAN);

        addMouseStatusControl(panel);
        addMouseStatusControl(l1);
        addMouseStatusControl(l2);
        addMouseStatusControl(l3);

        JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<JLabel> activeBackground = new JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<JLabel>() {
            @Override
            public void onActivation(JLabel object) {
                object.setOpaque(true);
                object.setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
            }


            @Override
            public void onDeactivation(JLabel object) {
                object.setOpaque(false);
                object.setBackground(object.getParent().getBackground());
            }

        };


        JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<JPanel> deactivateChildrens = new JComponenetActivationStatusChangeAction<JPanel>() {

            @Override
            public void onDeactivation(JPanel object) {
            }

            @Override
            public void onActivation(JPanel object) {

                for(Component component : object.getComponents()) {
                    if(component instanceof JComponent) {
                        ((JComponent) component).putClientProperty(JComponentActivationStatus.PROPERTY_KEY,JComponentActivationStatus.INACTIVE); 
                    }
                }
            }
        };

        addActivationStatusChangeAction(l1, activeBackground);
        addActivationStatusChangeAction(l2, activeBackground);
        addActivationStatusChangeAction(l3, activeBackground);
        addActivationStatusChangeAction(panel, deactivateChildrens);


        panel.add(l1);
        panel.add(l2);
        panel.add(l3);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);

}

The solution is very flexible and extendable in case you will need to add more labels.

The example is for those that want to learn. Any comment would be appreciate.

share|improve this answer
    
Very clever idea! Thanks for sharing! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 12:03
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels, an update about whole idea. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Nov 28 '11 at 17:35
    
Wow! It's going to take a bit for me to digest this all, but many many thanks for re-opening your answer and for uploading this great stuff! I've learned quite a bit from you and only wish I could give more up-votes. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 28 '11 at 18:06

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