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How do you split a list into evenly sized chunks in Python?

I am surprised I could not find a "batch" function that would take as input an iterable and return an iterable of iterables.

For example:

for i in batch(range(0,10), 1): print i
[0]
[1]
...
[9]

or:

for i in batch(range(0,10), 3): print i
[0,1,2]
[3,4,5]
[6,7,8]
[9]

Now, I wrote what I thought was a pretty simple generator:

def batch(iterable, n = 1):
   current_batch = []
   for item in iterable:
       current_batch.append(item)
       if len(current_batch) == n:
           yield current_batch
           current_batch = []
   if current_batch:
       yield current_batch

But the above does not give me what I would have expected:

for x in   batch(range(0,10),3): print x
[0]
[0, 1]
[0, 1, 2]
[3]
[3, 4]
[3, 4, 5]
[6]
[6, 7]
[6, 7, 8]
[9]

So, I have missed something and this probably shows my complete lack of understanding of python generators. Anyone would care to point me in the right direction ?

[Edit: I eventually realized that the above behavior happens only when I run this within ipython rather than python itself]

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marked as duplicate by Josh Smeaton, casperOne Nov 28 '11 at 1:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Good question, well written, but it already exists and will solve your problem. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 28 '11 at 1:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is probably more efficient (faster)

def batch(iterable, n = 1):
   l = len(iterable)
   for ndx in range(0, l, n):
       yield iterable[ndx:min(ndx+n, l)]

for x in batch(range(0, 10), 3):
    print x

It avoids building new lists.

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For the record, this is the fastest solution I found: mine = 4.5s, yours=0.43s, Donkopotamus = 14.8s –  mathieu Nov 29 '11 at 9:18
    
To be honest, I expected the itertools solutions to be faster. Glad I could help! –  Carl F. Dec 1 '11 at 2:07
3  
your batch in fact accepts a list (with len()), not iterable (without len()) –  tdihp Jan 10 at 7:47
    
This is faster because it isn't a solution to the problem. The grouper recipe by Raymond Hettinger - currently below this - is what you are looking for for a general solution that doesn't require the input object to have a len method. –  Robert E Mealey Oct 15 at 22:52

FWIW, the recipes in the itertools module provides this example:

def grouper(n, iterable, fillvalue=None):
    "grouper(3, 'ABCDEFG', 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

It works like this:

>>> list(grouper(3, range(10)))
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8), (9, None, None)]
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This is not exactly what I needed since it pads the last element with a set of None. i.e., None is a valid value in the data I actually use with my function so what I need instead is something that does not pad the last entry. –  mathieu Nov 29 '11 at 9:05

You probably have just placed another print statement in your function.

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As others have noted, the code you have given does exactly what you want. For another approach using itertools.islice you could see this recipe

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Weird, seems to work fine for me in Python 2.x

>>> def batch(iterable, n = 1):
...    current_batch = []
...    for item in iterable:
...        current_batch.append(item)
...        if len(current_batch) == n:
...            yield current_batch
...            current_batch = []
...    if current_batch:
...        yield current_batch
...
>>> for x in batch(range(0, 10), 3):
...     print x
...
[0, 1, 2]
[3, 4, 5]
[6, 7, 8]
[9]
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