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I'm building an XNA game and I'm trying to save game/map etc. state completely, and then be able to load and resume from exactly the same state.

My game logic consists of fairly complex elements (for serializing) such as references, delegates etc. I've done hours of research and decided that it's the best to use a DataContractSerializer that preserves the object references. (I also got around for delegates but that's another topic) I have no problem serializing and deserializing the state, re-creating the objects, the fields, lists, and even object references correctly and completely. But I've got a problem with cyclic references. Consider this scenario:

class X{
   public X another;
}

//from code:
X first = new X();
X second = new X();
first.another = second;
second.another = first;

Trying to serialize X will result in an exception complaining about cyclic references. If I comment out the last line it works fine. Well, I can imagine WHY it is happening, but I have no idea HOW to solve it. I've read somewhere that I can use the DataContract attribute with IsReference set to true, but it didn't change anything for me -- still got the error. (I want to avoid it anyway since the code I'm working on is portable code and may someday run on Xbox too, and portable library for Xbox doesn't support the assembly that DataContract is in.)

Here is the code to serialize:

class DataContractContentWriterBase<T> where T : GameObject
{
    internal void Write(Stream output, T objectToWrite, Type[] extraTypes = null)
    {
        if (extraTypes == null) { extraTypes = new Type[0]; }
        DataContractSerializer serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T), extraTypes, int.MaxValue, false, true, null);
        serializer.WriteObject(output, objectToWrite);
    }
}

and I'm calling this code from this class:

[ContentTypeWriter]
public class PlatformObjectTemplateWriter : ContentTypeWriter<TWrite>
(... lots of code ...)
    DataContractContentWriterBase<TWrite> writer = new DataContractContentWriterBase<TWrite>();
    protected override void Write(ContentWriter output, TWrite value)
    {
        writer.Write(output.BaseStream, value, GetExtraTypes());
    }

and for deserialization:

class DataContractContentReaderBase<T> where T: GameObject
{
    internal T Read(Stream input, Type[] extraTypes = null)
    {
        if (extraTypes == null) { extraTypes = new Type[0]; }
        DataContractSerializer serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T), extraTypes, int.MaxValue, false, true, null);
        T obj = serializer.ReadObject(input) as T;
        //return obj.Clone() as T; //clone falan.. bi bak iste.
        return obj;
    }
}

and it's being called by:

public class PlatformObjectTemplateReader : ContentTypeReader<TRead>
(lots of code...)
    DataContractContentReaderBase<TRead> reader = new DataContractContentReaderBase<TRead>();
    protected override TRead Read(ContentReader input, TRead existingInstance)
    {
        return reader.Read(input.BaseStream, GetExtraTypes());
    }

where:

PlatformObjectTemplate was my type to write.

Any suggestions?

SOLUTION: Just a few minutes ago, I've realized that I wasn't marking the fields with DataMember attribute, and before I added the DataContract attribute, the XNA serializer was somehow acting as the "default" serializer. Now, I've marked all the objects, and things are working perfectly now. I now have cyclic references with no problem in my model.

share|improve this question
    
If you're looking for an alternative serializer, protobuf-net (at least, v2 of it) might meet your requirements. –  Andrew Russell Nov 28 '11 at 2:16
    
thanks, it looks nice but i need a portable class library compatible code. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 28 '11 at 13:57
    
Did you check it? Is it not compatible? –  Andrew Russell Nov 29 '11 at 3:07
    
from the homepage, it states, protobuf-net is a .NET implementation of this, allowing you to serialize your .NET objects efficiently and easily. It is compatible with most of the .NET family, including .NET 2.0/3.0/3.5, .NET CF 2.0/3.5, Mono 2.x, Silverlight 2, etc. which apparantly doesn't seem to support PCL, yet. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 30 '11 at 17:25
    
Just because it doesn't list the PCL doesn't mean it won't work. The PCL itself is designed to be compatible with those very same (Microsoft) frameworks. So I would be surprised if protobuf-net can't be successfully built against the PCL. –  Andrew Russell Dec 1 '11 at 3:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you don't want to use [DataContract(IsReference=true)] then DataContractSerializer won't help you, because this attribute is the thing that does the trick with references.

So, you should either look for alternative serializers, or write some serialization code that transforms your graphs into some conventional representation (like a list of nodes + a list of links between them) and back, and then serialize that simple structure.

In case you decide to use DataContract(IsReference=true), here's a sample that serializes your graph:

[DataContract(IsReference = true)]
class X{
  [DataMember]
  public X another;
}

static void Main()
{
  //from code:
  var first = new X();
  var second = new X();
  first.another = second;
  second.another = first;

  byte[] data;
  using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
  {
    var serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(X));

    serializer.WriteObject(stream, first);
    data = stream.ToArray();
  }
  var str = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(data2);
}

The str will contain the following XML:

<X z:Id="i1" xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/GraphXmlSerialization"
   xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
   xmlns:z="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/">
  <another z:Id="i2">
    <another z:Ref="i1"/>
  </another>
</X>
share|improve this answer
    
if it works, i must be doing something wrong.. how should it be used? i typed it onto my class declaration and it simply didn't work. –  Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 28 '11 at 13:58
    
If you don't apply [DataContract(IsReference=true)], the serializer will render your graph as a tree: if there are several objects that have references to a single one, the latter will be doubled in the output. In the opposite case, only one reference will render the real object, while the rest will contain a special reference to the first one. You probably should try it yourself. BTW, this seems to cope fine with circular references. –  Pavel Gatilov Nov 28 '11 at 14:20
    
i actually applied, it works for normal references but throws exception in cyclic refs –  Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 28 '11 at 14:32
    
Please, see my updated reply for the sample code. –  Pavel Gatilov Nov 28 '11 at 14:33
    
ok, the weird thing is that when I look deeply into my exception, i realized that it actually complains about XNA's serializer's attribute even though I'm using my own DataContractSerializer to implement it. here is the error message I'm getting: "{"Cyclic reference found while serializing <my object here> You may be missing a ContentSerializerAttribute.SharedResource flag."}" but I don't have references to XNA in the assembly that I have my objects, and I won't have it, and i'm sure that I don't need it anyway (my objects don't have anything to do with XNA internally, hence non-referenced) –  Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 28 '11 at 15:13

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