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I wrote a small c program to print an extended ASCII char corresponding to value 129

#include<stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
  char a = 129;
  printf("%c\n",a);
  return(0);
}

compiled and run it on my unix machine (fedora 16) on bash terminal. it gives wrong display. it shows a question mark in back with white oval background.

infact, if I put a = anything above 126, it is showing same question mark.

why so and how to rectify it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First of all, I doubt this is bash's fault; bash just finds your program and runs it, while actually displaying your program's output is the job of your terminal application. Secondly, there are no ASCII characters above 127. Trying to print a character in the range 128..255 will emit a byte with the given value, but how that byte gets displayed is determined by your terminal and how it's configured. Most likely, your terminal expects all program output to be encoded in UTF-8; for backwards compatibility with ASCII, all bytes less than 128 are valid characters in UTF-8, but when bytes 128 and above are involved, only certain sequences are valid, and a lone byte with its high bit set is an error. Try printing the bytes 226, 152, and 131, in that order, from a single program; you'll know that your terminal is using UTF-8 if you see a snowman.

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no it is not showing any snowman.. same old white question mark with white background... any other idea? –  Saurabh Nov 28 '11 at 2:20
    
@Saurabh: Did you print the bytes with newlines in between, as in your example? The three bytes need to be printed one right after the other, without any other bytes in between; hence, there should only be one newline, after the three bytes. –  jwodder Nov 28 '11 at 2:23
    
got it.. now it prints a snowman.. So what is the gist now? my terminal is configured to expect all program output to be encoded in UTF-8, which is a modern scheme... how do i learn more about it and its usage? –  Saurabh Nov 28 '11 at 2:30
    
@Saurabh: This might sound crazy, but you could try reading about UTF-8 on Wikipedia. –  jwodder Nov 28 '11 at 2:33
1  
@Saurabh: In UTF-8, Unicode code points above 127 are encoded as sequences of two or more bytes, and 226-152-131 happens to be the byte sequence for character 9731 (0x2603), the snowman. –  jwodder Nov 30 '11 at 15:33

why do you think that there are ascii chars above 127?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII

ascii is basically 7 bit, 0-127

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point accepted.. now question is about extended ASCII.. could you please tell me why bash not displaying extended ASCII characters? –  Saurabh Nov 28 '11 at 2:15
1  
@Saurabh: "Extended ASCII" is not a single encoding and most often refers to CP437, which a modern UNIX system would not use by default. In the modern age, most non-ASCII text is expected to be in UTF-8, a completely different encoding in which lone bytes above 127 are not valid. –  jwodder Nov 28 '11 at 2:22

I wrote a bash script to display ascii 0-127 + extended 128-255. It is dependent on the system code page, terminal/console, etc.

Chars 0 - 31, 127 display codes from a table for the non-printables. All others are raw characters printed to screen.

#!/bin/sh
#
# asciie
#
# print the extended ascii table per the codepage of the current computer
#

# cls
echo -e \\033c

# headings for each column
echo -n "DEC HEX CHR"
printf " | DEC HEX CHR%.0s" {1..7}
printf "\n"

# div
echo -n "- - - - - - "
printf "| - - - - - - %.0s" {1..7}
printf "\n"


# begin character table for ascii 0 to 127 characters
tb=( 'NUL' 'SOH' 'STX' 'ETX' 'EOT' 'ENQ' 'ACK' 'BEL' 'BS ' 'HT ' 'LF ' 'VT ' 'FF ' 'CR ' 'SO ' 'SI ' \
'DLE' 'DC1' 'DC2' 'DC3' 'DC4' 'NAK' 'SYN' 'ETB' 'CAN' 'EM ' 'SUB' 'ESC' 'FS ' 'GS ' 'RS ' 'US ' \
'   ' '!  ' '"  ' '#  ' '$  ' '%  ' '&  '  \'   '(  ' ')  ' '   ' '+  ' ',  ' '-  ' '.  ' '/  ' \
'0  ' '1  ' '2  ' '3  ' '4  ' '5  ' '6  ' '7  ' '8  ' '9  ' ':  ' ';  ' '<  ' '=  ' '>  ' '?  ' \
'@  ' 'A  ' 'B  ' 'C  ' 'D  ' 'E  ' 'F  ' 'G  ' 'H  ' 'I  ' 'J  ' 'K  ' 'L  ' 'M  ' 'N  ' 'O  ' \
'P  ' 'Q  ' 'R  ' 'S  ' 'T  ' 'U  ' 'V  ' 'W  ' 'X  ' 'Y  ' 'Z  ' '[  ' '\  ' ']  ' '^  ' '_  ' \
'`  ' 'a  ' 'b  ' 'c  ' 'd  ' 'e  ' 'f  ' 'g  ' 'h  ' 'i  ' 'j  ' 'k  ' 'l  ' 'm  ' 'n  ' 'o  ' \
'p  ' 'q  ' 'r  ' 's  ' 't  ' 'u  ' 'v  ' 'w  ' 'x  ' 'y  ' 'z  ' '{  ' '|  ' '}  ' '~  ' 'DEL' \
)
# end of character table


# display the regular ascii characters 0 to 127
for a in `seq 0 15`
do

  let "b=$a+16"; let "c=b+16"; let "d=c+16"; let "e=d+16"; let "f=e+16"; let "g=f+16"; let "h=g+16"


  printf "%03d %03X % 3s | %03d %03X % 3s | " $a $a ${tb[$a]} $b $b ${tb[$b]}
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $c)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $d)   | " $c $c $d $d
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $e)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $f)   | " $e $e $f $f
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $g)   | " $g $g

  if [[ $a -lt 15 ]];then
    printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $h) \n" $h $h

  else
    printf "%03d %03X %03s \n" $h $h ${tb[$h]}

  fi

done
# end reg ascii

# begin extended ascii section
echo ' '

# display the extended ascii characters 128 to 255
for a in `seq 128 143`
do

  let "b=$a+16"; let "c=b+16"; let "d=c+16"; let "e=d+16"; let "f=e+16"; let "g=f+16"; let "h=g+16"

  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $a)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $b)   | " $a $a $b $b
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $c)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $d)   | " $c $c $d $d
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $e)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $f)   | " $e $e $f $f
  printf "%03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $g)   | %03d %03X \\$(printf %03o $h) \n" $g $g $h $h

done

# div
echo -n "- - - - - - "
printf "| - - - - - - %.0s" {1..7}
printf "\n"

 # display footers for each column
echo -n "DEC HEX CHR"
printf " | DEC HEX CHR%.0s" {1..7}
printf "\n"

# EOF #

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