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I'm trying to find the cube root of a negative number but I get a NaN. Any help?

System.out.println(Math.pow(-8, 1.0 / 3.0));
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Did you check the docs? It explicitly lists the cases where the result will be NaN. –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:11
    
You can also use this System.out.println(Math.cbrt(-8.0)); –  RanRag Nov 28 '11 at 2:16
    
Thanks to all who helped :) –  Chro Nov 28 '11 at 12:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The Java documentation for Math.pow states:

If the first argument is finite and less than zero [...] [and] if the second argument is finite and not an integer, then the result is NaN.

You could use Math.cbrt to get the cube root:

double result = Math.cbrt(-8.0);
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+1 for including solution; it's too hard to do all this on my phone--link was all I could muster. –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:15

Remember that mathematically, there are 3 cube-roots. Assuming you want the root that is real, you should do this:

x = 8;  //  Your value

if (x > 0)
    System.out.println(Math.pow(x, 1.0 / 3.0));
else
    System.out.println(-Math.pow(-x, 1.0 / 3.0));

EDIT : As the other answers mention, there is Math.cbrt(x). (which I didn't know existed)

The reason why pow returns NaN with a negative base and non-integral power is that powering is usually done by angle-magnitude in the complex plane.

  • For positive real numbers, the angle is zero, so the answer will still be positive and real.
  • For negative real numbers, the angle is 180 degrees, which (after multiplying by a non-integral power) will always produce a complex number - hence a NaN.
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Did you check that the second case will not return NaN? –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:13
    
No I didn't. Is there a case that will make the second case go NaN without actually putting in NaN or infinity? –  Mysticial Nov 28 '11 at 2:15
    
Indeed. The case we're discussing ;) –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:17
    
Really? I don't have a Java compiler in front of me right now to test it ATM... –  Mysticial Nov 28 '11 at 2:18
    
See the other answers; it's why I commented the link originally. Plus it's the exact code that returns NaN, just with a variable and a unary negative in front of it. –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:19

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html#cbrt(double)

System.out.println(Math.cbrt(-8));
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I think you got beat by both a comment and a previous answer ;) –  Dave Newton Nov 28 '11 at 2:20

From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html:

If the first argument is finite and less than zero

  • if the second argument is a finite even integer, the result is equal to the result of raising the absolute value of the first argument to the power of the second argument
  • if the second argument is a finite odd integer, the result is equal to the negative of the result of raising the absolute value of the first argument to the power of the second argument
  • if the second argument is finite and not an integer, then the result is NaN.
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