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I didn't consider logging module when I started with my script, so I just simply code like this:

LogMethod(LogFileName, LogMessage):
    LogRlock.acquire()

    LogFile = open(LogFileName, "a")
    LogFile.write(LogMessage)
    LogFile.close()

    LogRlock.release()

But now since logging module can do way better job in log file size / format control etc., I'm about to rewrite above method. Well, I kinda want a easy modify on this method, suppose I would code like this:

LogMethod(LogFileName, LogMessage):
    #### Do I need to destroy the instance Logger at the end of this method?
    LogRlock.acquire()

    Logger = logging.getLogger("Demo")
    Logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
    SizeHandler = logging.handlers.RotatingFileHandler(filename = LogFileName, mode = "a", maxBytes = 1000000)
    SimpleFormatter = logging.Formatter(fmt = '%(asctime)s%(message)s', datefmt = '[%Y-%m-%d, %H:%M:%S]:')
    SizeHandler.setFormatter(SimpleFormatter)
    Logger.addHandler(SizeHandler)
    Logger.info(LogMessage)

    LogRlock.release()

Python docs say logging module is thread-safe, so I guess I don't really need LogRlock, right? And another question, do I need to destroy the instance at the end of above method? If so, how should I do it? And is this a safe way to use logging module?

Thanks a lot

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What is LogRlock please? I cannot find this in any language reference?! –  gecco Nov 28 '11 at 8:26
    
@gecco: Oh, it's just a RLock from threading module, I just omitted that part in my code. There should be codes like this in advance: LogRlock = threading.RLock() I use it to avoid I/O error when you are trying to operate a file at the same time, multi-threaded –  Shane Nov 28 '11 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Python docs say logging module is thread-safe, so I guess I don't really need LogRlock, right?

Correct, you do not need a lock to protect your logging code.

And another question, do I need to destroy the instance at the end of above method? If so, how should I do it?

No, you do not. In fact, you can't destroy objects in Python. They will be automatically garbage-collected when there are no references to them.

Besides that, though, Logger objects are intended to persist for the lifetime of your program. Even if you could destroy it at the end of the logging function, you shouldn't.

And is this a safe way to use logging module?

No, not really. As has been pointed out in comments, you are performing setup operations on the logger (like adding handlers and formatters) in your logging method, when you should be doing them only once, at the beginning of your program. The way you are doing it now, each time you log a message, you wind up adding a handler, and each handler prints out each message it receives, so you'll find that the first message you log gets printed out once, the second one gets printed out twice, the third one three times, etc. until you wind up flooding your log files with unnecessary copies of your log messages.

I would recommend having some sort of setup function that gets called once at the beginning of your program to configure logging behavior. Everything about setting logger levels, adding handlers, and adding formatters goes in there. Then, in each module (.py file) where you use logging code, at the module level you can get the appropriate logger and store it in a module-level variable:

logger = logging.getLogger("package.module")

Or if you use multiple loggers in the module, do this for each of them. Within each function where you need to log a message, you can just do

def foo():
    ...
    logger.info("message")
    ...

This call to logger.info replaces your own LogMethod.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the detailed answer! –  Shane Nov 28 '11 at 11:33

Using a logger and defining its properties are two different tasks that should be separated in order to separate business logic from configuration logic.

Usually, in applications, you target a logger by its name. So basically, all you need to log would be a method like this:

def logMethod(loggerName, logMessage):
    logger = logging.getLogger(loggerName)
    logger.info(logMessage)

Defining the loggers properties can be done separately like this:

def configureLogger(loggerName):
    logger = logging.getLogger(loggerName)
    logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
    sizeHandler = logging.handlers.RotatingFileHandler(filename = LogFileName, mode = "a", maxBytes = 1000000)
    simpleFormatter = logging.Formatter(fmt = '%(asctime)s%(message)s', datefmt = '[%Y-%m-%d, %H:%M:%S]:')
    sizeHandler.setFormatter(simpleFormattesr)
    logger.addHandler(sizeHandler)

Another alternative to the here above presented "manual" logging configuration would be to use a logging configuration file or to use a configuration dictionary.

Python developers do not have to care about destroying objects, this is done by Python's garbage collector. In the case of the logging.Logger class this would even be an error to explicitly destroy the logger: The logger instance is stored by the logging module in order to return the same instance on every call of logging.getLogger (if same logger-name is provided) (The method logging.getLogger("Demo") creates a new instance on its first call) In your case that means that the RotatingFileHandler is added a second, third, forth ... time to your logger on every call of logMethod...

PS: Python coding convention: functions and variables start with an lowercase letter

share|improve this answer
    
Well, does this mean I will not have any problem with my method although it's not a good way? I mean in my method I actually keep generating new instances each time when I try to log a message. –  Shane Nov 28 '11 at 6:47
1  
No, you do not create a new instance. The method logging.getLogger("Demo") creates a new instance on its first call. For every subsequent call, the same instance is returned. In your case that means that the RotatingFileHandler is added a second, third ... time to your logger. –  gecco Nov 28 '11 at 6:52
    
Thanks mate, you are right! –  Shane Nov 28 '11 at 11:32

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