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I have numbers written as ASCII codes in my file. For example "9" is stored as two bytes 57 i.e. 8 bits in total.

I want to optimize storage by just storing those numbers as binary values for example numbers from 0-9 to be stored using 4 bits only.

Any help?!

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Do you mean "9" is stored as "57"? I cannot see how can an ascii 57 uses 2 bytes. –  gigadot Nov 28 '11 at 7:13
    
yes char "9" is stored in the file as two bytes one is 5 and the other is 7 –  shaklasah Nov 28 '11 at 7:15
    
You are likely to make bugs with your algorithm here. Can you not use Zip library to compress your file? Zip or an archive library has much more sophisticated algorithm than what you can come up yourself. –  gigadot Nov 28 '11 at 7:18
    
BTW: '9' takes up one byte, two with a separator. If you store it as an int binary it takes 4 bytes, that's twice as large. Using binary is no guarantee it will be much smaller. If you want more compact I suggest using GZIPOutputStream to compress the data. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 28 '11 at 7:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could write them binary like that

import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;


public class Bin {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        FileOutputStream fos = new  FileOutputStream("\\test.bin");
        String digits="12345";
        char[] chars = digits.toCharArray();
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < chars.length ; i+= 2 ) {
            byte b1 = (byte) (chars[i] - (byte) '0');
            byte b2 = (byte) (i < chars.length-1 ? chars[i+1] - (byte) '0' : 0xf);
            fos.write((byte) ((b1 << 4) | b2 ));
        }
        fos.close();
        FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("\\test.bin");
        StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer();
        byte[] buf = new byte[100];
        int read = fis.read(buf);
        ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(buf);
        for ( int i = 0 ; i < read ; i++ ) {
            byte both = (byte) bais.read();
            byte b1 = (byte) ((both >> 4 ) & 0xf);
            byte b2 = (byte) (both  & 0xf) ;
            result.append( Character.forDigit(b1, 10));
            if ( b2 != 0xf ) {
                result.append(Character.forDigit(b2,10));
            }
        }
        System.out.println(result.toString());
    }
}

But I doubt that this will be very useful

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Great! Man Just tell me then how can I read my characters back and store them in a string. The string we started with –  shaklasah Nov 28 '11 at 7:32
    
@shaklasah Reading them back was way harder than I thought, note the 0xf written in case the source string is odd. It is used as padding since we can only write complete bytes. –  stacker Nov 28 '11 at 7:54
    
Thanks my friend, but I think there still is a problem. Try encoding 98765.. –  shaklasah Nov 28 '11 at 12:43

What about this ? 0 => 0000 1 => 0001 2 => 0010 3 => 0011 4 => 0100 5 => 0101 6 => 0110 7 => 0111 8 => 1000 9 => 1001

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Yes but how am I going to write this to the file?! –  shaklasah Nov 28 '11 at 7:15
    
you can use file output stream to write into a file –  nidhin Nov 28 '11 at 7:17
    
yes but that will treat each digit as two bytes again and it will become even worse as 0000 will be considered as 8 byte :S –  shaklasah Nov 28 '11 at 7:21
    
In this case you should write your own conversion mechanism. –  nidhin Nov 28 '11 at 7:28

I would stick with the standard DataOutputStream which can write primitive types to the output in a portable way.

It has writeLong, writeInt. With these methods you can write out your data, then later load it with DataInputStream's readLong and readInt.

If this is not compact enough you can compress it later with any compression library.

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If you write character it will take 1byte for each character. You have to write binary or boolean data. You can represent 5=>0101 but if you write 0101 as a character it will take 4bytes and if you write binary or boolean it will take bits.

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