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I'm interested in optimizing my code for multithreaded computing. In terms of the cache, pipelining, or any other aspects of memory access, how do the following compare for conserving those resources:

Case 1

struct something{
    float a;
    float b;
    int c;
    bool d;
};

vector <something> vec(n, something());

for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    {
         vec[q].a = expression1;
         vec[q].b = expression2;
         vec[q].c = expression3;
         vec[q].d = expression4;
    } 

Case 2

struct something{
    float a;
    float b;
    int c;
    bool d;
};

vector <something> vec(n, something());

for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    vec[q].a = expression1;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    vec[q].b = expression2;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    vec[q].c = expression3;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    vec[q].d = expression4;

Case 3

vector <float> a(n);
vector <float> b(n);
vector <int>   c(n);
vector <bool>  d(n); 

for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    a[q] = expression1;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    b[q] = expression2;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    c[q] = expression3;
for(int q=0; q<n; q++)
    d[q] = expression4;

Also, are there better ways of approaching the above?

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My guess is second is the worst, and third might be the best if you merge 4 for loops into one, as in first example. Also, don't forget vector<bool> is a specialization, you might not want that. –  Violet Giraffe Nov 28 '11 at 7:30
    
@Violet: But that would make it the same as case 2, which is clearly worst in terms of cache access. –  TonyK Nov 28 '11 at 7:33
    
Question title asks for cache-friendly, question body asks for multithreaded optimization. Make up your mind, those are completely different things. –  hamstergene Nov 28 '11 at 7:34
    
@hamstergene Sorry, my bad. I guess I thought it would be ok since the cache is a common bottleneck to multithreading. So that first line is more like, just checking to make sure I should really be wondering about the cache. –  Matt Munson Nov 28 '11 at 7:40
    
@TonyK: It absolutely wouldn't! –  Violet Giraffe Nov 28 '11 at 7:43
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Case 1 is the most readable.
  • Case 1 and case 3 are equally cache friendly. Both make only one pass through all the data.*
  • Case 2 is the worst because it makes 4 passes over the data - each pass only touching one element.

If all the struct fields are different, then case 3 has a huge advantage of possibly being vectorizable while case 1 doesn't.

The reason for this is because case 3 is the struct of arrays packing that puts all the same datatypes together sequentially in memory - thereby exposing vectorization.

EDIT :

*Case 3 is potentially even more cache friendly than case 1 because it doesn't need struct-padding - so the data size is smaller.

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@Mystical cool. Would it matter which order you access the elements in? I thought I heard somewhere that you can move forwards but not backwards through the cache so that's why I ask. –  Matt Munson Nov 28 '11 at 7:35
    
As long as it's sequential, it doesn't matter. Processors are able to prefetch both forwards and backwards. (though I'm not aware if it's able to do one direction better than the other) –  Mysticial Nov 28 '11 at 7:37
    
Some processors only prefetch forwards. Anyway, there's no point in doing things backwards for no reason! And prefetching is separate from caching. A fetch from memory will always get the whole cacheline whether the first or last word was touched. –  Potatoswatter Nov 28 '11 at 7:43
    
@MattMunson moving backwards are more likely to cause cache missing. –  BruceAdi Nov 28 '11 at 7:48
    
@Potato So fetching is the process of putting something into the cache right? And then prefetching is putting something into the cache in anticipation? So then some processors only do that the if the memory needed soon is located forward in RAM but not backwards? Is that right? –  Matt Munson Nov 28 '11 at 7:51
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In terms of cache access, Case 2 is clearly the worst: it will reload memory into cache 4 times.

Case 3 is the same as Case 1 when filling data, but may be worse for later use (assuming that a b c d are related and will likely be read together).

This one is even better than case 1:

for (vector<something>::iterator it = vec.begin(); it != vec.end(); ++it)
{
    it->a = e1;
    it->b = e2;
    it->c = e3;
    it->d = e4;
}

What will be faster depends on many things. For example, computing complex expressions in wrong order may be much worse than any cache misses. You should never make pure theoretical choices without doing real profiling.

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That's why I like C++11's auto keyword ;) –  arne Nov 28 '11 at 7:32
    
@hamstergene how much quicker is this way? Which step is it cutting out? –  Matt Munson Nov 28 '11 at 7:43
    
@MattMunson It removes indexing operation (operator []). –  hamstergene Nov 28 '11 at 7:51
    
But you get back operator->, which is equally expensive. (i.e. a trivial address operation which will be done in parallel with the previous memory access.) –  MSalters Nov 28 '11 at 9:48
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Case 1 is best. Case 3 is just as good in terms of cache access, but it has a slight performance overhead from the extra loops. Case 2 is what you have to avoid.

But why don't you run some benchmarks, and let us know the results?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not going to -1 you, but "slight performance overhead from the extra loops" is not true. Branch prediction and loop unrolling take care of that nicely. It's even possible that the optimizer might have an easier time with shorter loop bodies. –  Potatoswatter Nov 28 '11 at 7:45
    
@Potato: Only benchmarks will tell. –  TonyK Nov 28 '11 at 8:28
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