Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just started working with Qt, and I'm quite lost with the whole signal-slot system.
I understand the general concept, but I can't understand what is the proper way to design my GUI code. Is it supposed to be an hierarchy of classes holding pointers to each other? For example, if I have a main window, let's say W1, with button, B1, that should open another window, W2.
It's quite obvious why W1's class should hold a pointer to B1, but it seems that I need to hold pointer to W2's class, in order to connect B1's clicked() signal to some custom slot of W2, and I don't understand why... Isn't the signal-slot mechanism designed to be generic and not specific-instance-wise? What is the proper way of designing this example's code?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Connections are always created between instances of class. Signals and slots are mechanism to inform one instances of class B that there was a change or event in instances of class A.

Below is design of class W1 that will show window W2 when button B1 will be clicked. I skipped initialization of class W1, also getting button B1 because there are few ways to create UI of your window. I added check if connection was successful, just for safety (my habit).

class W1 :public QWidget
{
public:
A(QWidget *parent = 0):QWidget(parent)
{
   //init
   B1 = getB1();
   if(!connect(B1,SIGNAL(clicked()),this,SLOT(show_W2())))
       qFatal("%s %i connection failed B1->clicked this->show_W2",__FILE__,__LINE__);
}

public slots:
   void show_W2()
   {
      QWidget *W2 = new Window2(this->parent());
      //create window 
   }
protected:
    QPushButton *B1;
}

Here is different approach to your example, where class W1 don't now anything about class W2:

class W1 :public QWidget
{
public:
A(QWidget *parent = 0):QWidget(parent)
{
   //init
   B1 = getB1();
   if(!connect(B1,SIGNAL(clicked()),this,SIGNAL(B1_clicked())))
       qFatal("%s %i connection failed B1->clicked this->B1_clicked",__FILE__,__LINE__);
}

signals:
   B1_clicked()
}

void MainWindow::creatW1()
{
    W1 *_w1 = new W1;
    if(!connect(_w1,SIGNAL(B1_clicked()),this,SLOT(createW2())))
       qFatal("%s %i connection failed _w1->B1_clicked this->show_W2",__FILE__,__LINE__);
}
share|improve this answer
    
where i can find how to initialize class of widget properly? –  Sugar Dec 25 '13 at 9:18
    
Do you mean Ui initialization? If you have installed Qt Creator, create Qt GUI project with checked option "Create form", and check the generated code. This is recommended way of initialization in most cases. –  firescreamer Dec 27 '13 at 21:25
    
In most cases UI initialization is manual. Even in examples and tutorials of Qt. It's a little stunning. Generated code was helpful. –  Sugar Jan 13 at 7:04
add comment

What is the proper way of designing this example's code?

Create a simple UI with Qt Designer and look at what it generates. That helped me a lot when i was starting with Qt.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I have done, but how do I create a connection between 2 widgets/classes? The signal-slot editor doesn't recognize other classes slots... –  Royi Freifeld Nov 28 '11 at 8:45
2  
Connect these manually in your code. See QObject::connect(). –  arrowdodger Nov 28 '11 at 9:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.