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I have a program that does a memory intensive simulation. Below I've written a small consoleapplication that replicates the problem I'm having.

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        var t = new Task(() => DoMemoryHog(20000000));
        t.Start();
        t.Wait();
        t.Dispose();
        t = null;
        GC.Collect();
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void DoMemoryHog(int n) {
        ConcurrentBag<double> results = new ConcurrentBag<double>();

        Parallel.For(0, n, (i) => {
            results.Add(Math.Sqrt(i.GetHashCode()));
        });
    }
}

When I run the program, I can see the amount of used memory increasing in the windows task manager, but when the task is finished (and "Done" is displayed) the memory doesn't go back to it's original level, that only happens when I close the application.

Does anyone know how to free up memory used by a parallel task, while the main application keeps running? As you can see, I've already tried disposing it, setting it's reference to null and running the garbage collector manually (which you shouldn't do, I know).

Thanks in advance, this has been bugging me for months now!

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1  
Please tag an answer as resolved if you don't have further problems. Thanks! –  oberfreak Nov 30 '11 at 17:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm sure you don't have a problem with your memory, .NET just doesn't shrink the used Memory so it can be assigend in the future. This saves time for future memory allocation. Try to rerun the loop after it finished, i'm sure the memory wouldn't grow.

So please just try this, i would be intrested in the outcome!

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Process currentProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            var t = new Task(() => DoMemoryHog(20000000));
            t.Start();
            t.Wait();
            t.Dispose();
            t = null;
            GC.Collect();
            Console.WriteLine("Done" +i);
            Console.WriteLine("Memory: " + GC.GetTotalMemory(false));
            Console.WriteLine("Paged: " + currentProcess.PagedMemorySize64);
            Console.WriteLine("-------------------------");
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void DoMemoryHog(int n) {
        ConcurrentBag<double> results = new ConcurrentBag<double>();

        Parallel.For(0, n, (i) =>
        {
            results.Add(Math.Sqrt(i.GetHashCode()));
        });
    }
}

Those two methods are used to print out memory usage:

GC.GetTotalMemory();
currentProcess.PagedMemorySize64;

My output is:

Done0
Memory: 480080992
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done1
Memory: 480081512
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done2
Memory: 480082160
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done3
Memory: 480083476
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done4
Memory: 480083496
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done5
Memory: 480083516
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done6
Memory: 480083536
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done7
Memory: 480084204
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done8
Memory: 480084204
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------
Done9
Memory: 480085500
Paged: 520753152
-------------------------

As far as i can see there is no memory problem here. The objects are cleand up and the memory is reused propery. Issue solved or?

Update

Private bytes behavior:

PrivateBytes of application

As you can see the GC is collecting the Objects and freeing the memory, but it's currently not releasing it, so new objects can be allocated.

share|improve this answer
    
You want private bytes.... –  leppie Nov 28 '11 at 9:47
    
yes, please! Would be verry interesed! –  oberfreak Nov 28 '11 at 9:57
    
How are the private bytes doing? –  oberfreak Nov 29 '11 at 7:15
    
YOU are suppose to look at it. Not me. –  leppie Nov 29 '11 at 7:17
1  
By the way: what is that nice performance tool thingy you posted a screenshot of? It looks very usefull! –  jkokorian Dec 6 '11 at 19:22

This is due to the nature of a concurrentBag (see my earlier question regarding ConcurrentBag ( Possible memoryleak in ConcurrentBag? )).

Basically, a concurrent bag stores items on the local thread. If you dont consume the items, the items will stay on the local thread. Please check the following example:

    class TrackedItem
    {
        public TrackedItem()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Constructor!");
        }
        ~TrackedItem()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Destructor!");
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Action allCollect = () =>
            {
                GC.Collect();
                GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
                GC.Collect();
            };

        // create a single item and loose it directly thereafter
        TrackedItem item = new TrackedItem();
        item = null;
        allCollect();
        // Constructor!, Destructor!

        ConcurrentBag<TrackedItem> bag = new ConcurrentBag<TrackedItem>();
        bag.Add(new TrackedItem());
        bag = null;
        allCollect();
        // Constructor!
        // Note that the destructor was not called since there is still a collection on the local thread

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

The concurrentBag makes use of the ThreadLocal class which makes it convenient to hold 1 instance per thread. The intended way for disposing data in a ThreadLocal is by calling the Dispose method on ThreadLocal (ThreadLocal implements IDisposable). This disposes only the data for the current thread. The concurrentBag doesn't dispose it's ThreadLocals though. Instead it relies on all items being consumed- or a thread hosting the ThreadLocal being disposed. this can be very nasty however when you share threads like within a ThreadPool.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, I'm sure I can work around it now! –  jkokorian Nov 28 '11 at 8:57
    
As it turned out, there was no memory leak. The graph of the private bytes show that the first few times the total memory reserved for the application keeps increasing. It stabilizes after 5 iterations approximately. Before it could reach '5 times' though, an out of memory exception was thrown because the WCF application that was running the problematic process was hosted in the ISS development server (which is 32bit), and was being debugged at the same time (which restricts the memory useage of a process apparently). I set everything to 64 bit and run the WCF service in IIS: problem solved. –  jkokorian Jan 21 '12 at 14:44

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