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I'm not a designer. When writing CSS it often happens that I need to add some padding to an element. How do you avoid that padding to propagate to the parent element ?

HTML:

<div id="outer">
  <input id="login">
</div>

CSS:

#outer {
  width: 300px;
}

#login {
  width: 100%;
  padding: 1em;
}

If you use that HTML+CSS, you'll see that the #outer element is bigger than 300px. The easiest solution if to re-write the #login's width to "300px - to_pixel(1em)". It works well but also means that now the font size needs to be fixed. Is there another way where I don't need to convert everything in pixels ?

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what have font size to do with padding? dont get it... anyway, width of element = width + padding + border + margin according to css box model w3schools.com/css/css_boxmodel.asp –  Gatekeeper Nov 28 '11 at 10:09
    
It's such a shame that support for CSS3 calc() is so poor. It would make this a breeze. –  Andy E Nov 28 '11 at 10:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you want is the box-sizing property. Take a look at this jsFiddle for it in practice. Just add this:

-moz-box-sizing: border-box;
-webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
box-sizing: border-box;

to your #login CSS. This is supported in most modern browsers, including IE8+.

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Over complicated, not supported in IE7. Please see my response/fiddle.... –  tarmes Nov 28 '11 at 11:06
    
Sweet, works perfectly. This was a long time bummer for me :) –  zimbatm Dec 1 '11 at 19:14

You can css box-sizing property like this:

#outer {
  width: 300px;
    background:red;
    height:100px;
}

#login {
  width: 100%;
  padding: 1em;
    -moz-box-sizing:border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
    box-sizing:border-box;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/TQXdn/

box-sizing is not work in IE7

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Yes you have to fix this or adjust according to width + padding . The Actual Size when you are using padding will be

actual size = Defined Width + Padding Width + Border Width

then if you want to limit it to the container size then take care about the CSS box model

#outer {
  width: 300px;
    border:1px solid red;
    padding:1em;
}

#login {
  width: 100%;
}

It will put the input in center of the container.. Use Box Model as suggested in question comments also.

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#outer {
  width: 300px;
  background:red;
  height:100px;
  position: relative;
}

#login {
  position: absolute;
  left: 1em;
  right: 1em;
  top: 1em;
  bottom: 1em;
}

See it here:

http://jsfiddle.net/22ABj/

share|improve this answer
    
Odd, mine's the best and most portable answer. It doesn't require box-sizing, and yet no votes :( –  tarmes Nov 28 '11 at 11:03
    
You're relying on absolute positioning, which means that: a) you need to specify a height for the container and b) the input itself has no padding (rather the container has the illusion of padding), which is presumably not the desired visual effect. If IE7 support is essential, some variation on @Niranjan's answer is the most practical. –  CherryFlavourPez Nov 28 '11 at 11:18

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