Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I have a simple question - i have 2 tables (addresses and users - user has one address, lot of users can live at the same address)... I created a sqlalchemy mapping like this: when I get my session and try to query something like

    class Person(object):
'''
classdocs
'''
 idPerson = Column("idPerson", Integer, primary_key = True)
 name = Column("name", String)
 surname = Column("surname", String)
 idAddress = Column("idAddress", Integer, ForeignKey("pAddress.idAddress"))
 idState = Column("idState", Integer, ForeignKey("pState.idState"))
 Address = relationship(Address, primaryjoin=idAddress==Address.idAddress)

class Address(object):
'''
Class to represent table address object
'''
 idAddress = Column("idAddress", Integer, primary_key=True)
 street = Column("street", String)
 number = Column("number", Integer)
 postcode = Column("postcode", Integer)
 country = Column("country", String) 
 residents = relationship("Person",order_by="desc(Person.surname, Person.name)", primaryjoin="idAddress=Person.idPerson") 




    self.tablePerson = sqlalchemy.Table("pPerson", self.metadata, autoload=True)
    sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Person, self.tablePerson)
    self.tableAddress = sqlalchemy.Table("pAddress", self.metadata, autoload=True)
    sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Address, self.tableAddress) 


myaddress = session.query(Address).get(1);
print myaddress.residents[1].name

=> I get TypeError: 'RelationshipProperty' object does not support indexing

I understand residents is there to define the relationship but how the heck can I get the list of residents that the given address is assigned to?! Thanks

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You define a relationship in a wrong place. I think you are mixing Declarative Extension with non-declarative use:

  1. when using declarative, you define your relations in your model.
  2. otherwise, you define them when mapping model to a table

If option-2 is what you are doing, then you need to remove both relationship definitions from the models, and add it to a mapper (only one is enought):

mapper(Address, tableAddress,
properties={'residents': relationship(Person, order_by=(desc(Person.name), desc(Person.surname)), backref="Address"),}
) 

Few more things about the code above:

  1. Relation is defined only on one side. The backref takes care about the other side.
  2. You do not need to specify the primaryjoin (as long as you have a ForeignKey specified, and SA is able to infer the columns)
  3. Your order_by configuration is not correct, see code above for the version which works.
share|improve this answer

You might try defining Person after Address, with a backref to Address - this will create the array element:

class Address(object):
 __tablename__ = 'address_table'
 idAddress = Column("idAddress", Integer, primary_key=True)

class Person(object):
 idPerson = Column("idPerson", Integer, primary_key = True)
 ...
 address_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('address_table.idAddress'))
 address = relationship(Address, backref='residents')

Then you can query:

myaddress = session.query(Address).get(1);
for residents in myaddress.residents:
  print name

Further, if you have a lot of residents at an address you can further filter using join:

resultset = session.query(Address).join(Address.residents).filter(Person.name=='Joe')
# or
resultset = session.query(Person).filter(Person.name=='Joe').join(Person.address).filter(Address.state='NY')
and resultset.first() or resultset[0] or resultset.get(...) etc...
share|improve this answer
    
well I have both classes in separate files. I have my db init object that does ORM self.tableAddress = sqlalchemy.Table("pAddress", self.metadata, autoload=True) addressMapper = sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Address, self.tableAddress) self.tablePerson = sqlalchemy.Table("pPerson", self.metadata, autoload=True) personMapper = sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Person, self.tablePerson) After I did what you suggested and get AttributeError: 'Address' object has no attribute 'residents'. Isnt the problem autoload=True" statement? I dont think that the backref gets created –  kosta5 Nov 28 '11 at 11:46
    
I've never used .Table()... my understanding was this was if you were connecting to tables outside of the ORM. (As in use Table() or relationship in your class, but not both...) You might check - sqlalchemy.org/docs/core/… –  Adam Nov 28 '11 at 12:07
    
Also, using relationship() for a table class defined in a separate file is okay... just make sure your imports aren't circular, otherwise it causes issues when creating the tables the first time. –  Adam Nov 28 '11 at 12:08
    
Looks like mapper() is to support the classical mappings: sqlalchemy.org/docs/orm/mapper_config.html, you can join tables without this using the declarative style: sqlalchemy.org/docs/orm/relationships.html#one-to-many ... in my experience, the example on this last link is confusing, using a backref on the [one] class to the [many] class seems to creates the array how you'd expect. –  Adam Nov 28 '11 at 12:15
    
well I tried this: class Person: pass Class Address: pass self.tableAddress = sqlalchemy.Table("pAddress", self.metadata, autoload=True) addressMapper = sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Address, self.tableAddress) self.tablePerson = sqlalchemy.Table("pPerson", self.metadata, autoload=True) personMapper = sqlalchemy.orm.mapper(Person, self.tablePerson) That is just simply loading everything from the DB (its there) but now I get sqlalchemy.exc.ArgumentError: Argument 'class_' is expected to be of type '<type 'type'>', got '<type 'classobj'>' I have to say hibernate is better –  kosta5 Nov 28 '11 at 12:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.