Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In javascript, here is my start array:

[{
   name: 'aaa',
   value: 1
 },
 {
   name: 'bbb',
   value: 0
 },
 {
   name: 'bbb',
   value: 1
}]

I want to transform it into this array as result:

[{
   name: 'aaa',
   value: 1
 },
 {
   name: 'bbb',
   value: [0, 1]
 }]

I need a good and simple algorithm to do this

share|improve this question
1  
Do you want to modify the array in-place or to create a new one? – Frédéric Hamidi Nov 28 '11 at 11:43
2  
What you should really drive for is a situation where value is always an array; even if it's length 1. It'll make things a hell of a lot easier. – Matt Nov 28 '11 at 11:44
    
@Matt I bet the example included that case specifically to show how the algorithm should handle 1-value cases. – bezmax Nov 28 '11 at 11:46
1  
@Max: I guessed that as well, that's why I'm recommending an alternate algorithm :). Trying to use the array later down the line and not knowing whether you'll be retrieving an array or number will be a PITA. – Matt Nov 28 '11 at 11:48
1  
@Matt: it's an array generated by Jquery serializeArray(). When you got a multiple select element, it will generate like that. This algorithm will help to group all the data together. If you convert all to array, on server side, you can't know whether an element is a multiple element or not. – Thanh Trung Nov 28 '11 at 14:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about:

var array = [{
   name: 'aaa',
   value: 1
 },
 {
   name: 'bbb',
   value: 0
 },
 {
   name: 'bbb',
   value: 1
}];

var map = {};    
for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
  var name = array[i].name;
  if (map[name] === undefined) {
    map[name] = [];
  }
  map[name].push(array[i].value);
}

var result = [];
for(var key in map) {
  var value = map[key];
  result.push({
    name: key, 
    value: value.length === 1 ? value[0] : value
  });
}

Easiest way is to create a map to keep track of which names are used. Then convert this map back to an array of objects.

If you want to use Arrays for value then change it to:

result.push({
  name: key, 
  value: value
});
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution does not satisfy the requirements. 1-value case will result in value: [1] not value: 1 as was requested. – bezmax Nov 28 '11 at 11:48
1  
Indeed. I updated my sample – Jan Nov 28 '11 at 11:54
    
You've beaten me to it with practically the same solution. :) – Robert Koritnik Nov 28 '11 at 12:01
    
You even made the same mistake :) – Jan Nov 28 '11 at 12:04
    
@Jan: Which one? You mean the requirement? Well I think that's an added complexity requirements anyway because it needs checking afterwards. It's much better to keep all values as arrays to avoid unnecessary code checks afterwards. – Robert Koritnik Nov 28 '11 at 12:06

here's pseudocode for simplest implementation

hash = {}
for(pair in array) {
    hash[pair.name] ||= []
    hash[pair.name] << pair.value
}

result = []
for(k, v in hash) {
    result << {name: k, value: v}
}
share|improve this answer
    
What does (hash[pair.name] << pair.value) mean? – Thanh Trung Nov 28 '11 at 13:35
    
pushes an element to array – keymone Nov 28 '11 at 13:46
    
There are syntax errors. Javascript doesn't accept hash[pair.name] ||= [] and hash[pair.name] << pair.value (copied pasted exactly like that in my editor) – Thanh Trung Nov 28 '11 at 14:08
    
apparently because i gave you pseudocode. you have to figure out the details on your own. btw ||= is assignment operation which only executes if left-hand value is empty. – keymone Nov 28 '11 at 14:17
    
Ok thx, I'm not good with pseudo-code anyway. Your code looks like the codes above. – Thanh Trung Nov 28 '11 at 14:39

This function does the trick

function consolidate(var arrayOfObjects)    
{
    // create a dictionary of values first
    var dict = {};
    for(var i = 0; i < arrayOfObjects.length; i++)
    {
        var n = arrayOfObjects[i].name;
        if (!dict[n])
        {
            dict[n] = [];
        }
        dict[n].push(arrayOfObjects[i].value);
    }

    // convert dictionary to array again        
    var result = [];
    for(var key in dict)
    {
        result.push({
            name: key,
            value: dict[key].length == 1 ? dict[key][0] : dict[key]
        });
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

An alternative solution:

function convert(arr) {
    var res = [];
    var map = {};

    for (var i=0;i<arr.length;i++) {
        var arrObj = arr[i];
        var oldObj = map[arrObj.name];
        if (oldObj == undefined) {
            oldObj = {name:arrObj.name, value:arrObj.value};
            map[arrObj.name] = oldObj;
            res.push(oldObj);
        } else {
            if( typeof oldObj.value === 'number' ) {
                oldObj.value = [oldObj.value];
            }
            oldObj.value.push(arrObj.value);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

In theory it should work a bit faster and use less memory. Basically it creates a result array and a map which is an index for the same array (no duplicate objects). So it fills the result in one iteration instead of two and does not need to convert map to array (which saves several CPU cycles :P ).

Added: Here is a variation of that function in case value: [1] is acceptable:

function convert(arr) {
    var res = [];
    var map = {};

    for (var i=0;i<arr.length;i++) {
        var arrObj = arr[i];
        var oldObj = map[arrObj.name];
        if (oldObj == undefined) {
            oldObj = {name:arrObj.name, value:[arrObj.value]};
            map[arrObj.name] = oldObj;
            res.push(oldObj);
        } else {
            oldObj.value.push(arrObj.value);
        }
    }
    return res;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.