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Consider this command:

ls /mydir/*.txt | xargs chown root

The intention is to change owners of all text files in mydir to root

The issue is that if there are no .txt files in mydir then xargs thows an error saying there is no path specified. This is a harmless example because an error is being thrown, but in some cases, like in the script that i need to use here, a blank path is assumed to be the current directory. So if I run that command from /home/tom/ then if there is no result for ls /mydir/*.txt and all files under /home/tom/ have their owners changed to root.

So how can I have xargs ignore an empty result?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Use the -r or --no-run-if-empty option:

--no-run-if-empty
-r
If the standard input does not contain any nonblanks, do not run the command. Normally, the command is run once even if there is no input. This option is a GNU extension.

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I honestly searched in google first and found this (but wouldn't have asked without reading the manual). I kind of thought this hould be the default behavior, not needing a switch to enable it. –  JonnyJD Jun 25 '13 at 15:55

man xargs says --no-run-if-empty.

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Users of non-GNU xargs may take advantage of -L <#lines>, -n <#args>, -i, and -I <string>:

ls /empty_dir/ | xargs -n10 chown root   # chown executed every 10 args
ls /empty_dir/ | xargs -L10 chown root   # chown executed every 10 lines
ls /empty_dir/ | xargs -i cp {} {}.bak   # every {} is replaced with the args from one input line
ls /empty_dir/ | xargs -I ARG cp ARG ARG.bak # like -i, with a user-specified placeholder

Keep in mind that xargs splits the line at whitespace but quoting and escaping are available; RTFM for details.

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Does not seem to answer the question? –  Nicolas Raoul Jul 21 at 8:24
1  
@Nicolas: it's the way to prevent execution if your version of xargs does not support the --no-run-if-empty switch and attempts to run the command argument without STDIN input (this is the case in Solaris 10). The versions in other unixes may just ignore an empty list (e.g. AIX). –  arielCo Jul 21 at 18:48

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