Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are some recommended approaches to achieving thread-safe lazy initialization? For instance,

// Not thread-safe
public Foo getInstance(){
    if(INSTANCE == null){
        INSTANCE = new Foo();
    }

    return INSTANCE;
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

For singletons there is an elegant solution by delegating the task to the JVM code for static initialization.

public class Something {
    private Something() {
    }

    private static class LazyHolder {
            public static final Something INSTANCE = new Something();
    }

    public static Something getInstance() {
            return LazyHolder.INSTANCE;
    }
}

see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initialization_on_demand_holder_idiom

and this blog post of Crazy Bob Lee

http://blog.crazybob.org/2007/01/lazy-loading-singletons.html

share|improve this answer
1  
This will not sufice in case your new instance takes parameters. Something like new Something(a,b,c) and that a,b,c is passed through getInstance(a,b,c). In that case, you have to use the double null checking aproach as seen in wikipedia. –  monzonj May 24 '12 at 7:44
    
@monzonj Actually you can by having the inner class reference (private)static fields in the outer class. –  Stefan Mar 13 '13 at 22:31

The easiest way is to use a static inner holder class :

public class Singleton {

    private Singleton() {
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return Holder.INSTANCE;
    }

    private static class Holder {
        private static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you're using Apache Commons Lang, then you can use one of the variations of ConcurrentInitializer like LazyInitializer.

Example:

lazyInitializer = new LazyInitializer<Foo>() {

        @Override
        protected Foo initialize() throws ConcurrentException {
            return new Foo();
        }
    };

You can now safely get Foo (gets initialized only once):

Foo instance = lazyInitializer.get();
share|improve this answer
class Foo {
  private volatile Helper helper = null;
  public Helper getHelper() {
    if (helper == null) {
      synchronized(this) {
        if (helper == null) {
          helper = new Helper();
        }
      }
    }
  return helper;
}

This is called double checking! Check this http://jeremymanson.blogspot.com/2008/05/double-checked-locking.html

share|improve this answer
4  
-1 needs to be volatile, and needs to be post 1.5 –  Pete Kirkham Nov 28 '11 at 15:02
    
There's a mistake in there. Keep it simple. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 28 '11 at 15:03
2  
To quote from the linked blog "This code doesn't work in Java." –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 28 '11 at 15:11
2  
sorry! it was my fault! I was trying to provide fast answer to easy question –  narek.gevorgyan Nov 28 '11 at 15:32
    
This is a correct and valid answer. Better source (also given in the blog article): cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html –  Lucas Hoepner Mar 3 at 15:52

Put the code in a synchronized block with some suitable lock. There are some other highly specialist techniques, but I'd suggest avoiding those unless absolutely necessary.

Also you've used SHOUTY case, which tends to indicate a static but an instance method. If it is really static, I suggest you make sure it isn't in any way mutable. If it's just an expensive to create static immutable, then class loading is lazy anyway. You may want to move it to a different (possibly nested) class to delay creation to the absolute last possible moment.

share|improve this answer
1  
Lazy initialization itself should be avoided unless you really need it. –  toto2 Nov 28 '11 at 15:08

Depending on what you try to achieve:

If you want all Threads to share the same instance, you can make the method synchronized. This will be sufficient

If you want to make a separate INSTANCE for each Thread, you should use java.lang.ThreadLocal

share|improve this answer
    
I want all threads to share the same instance. –  mre Nov 28 '11 at 15:02
    
simpliest way is to make the getInstance() a synchronized method. –  Funtik Nov 28 '11 at 15:03

Try to defined the method which gets an instance as synchronized:

public synchronized Foo getInstance(){
   if(INSTANCE == null){
    INSTANCE = new Foo();
  }

  return INSTANCE;
 }

Or use a variable:

private static final String LOCK = "LOCK";
public synchronized Foo getInstance(){
  synchronized(LOCK){
     if(INSTANCE == null){
       INSTANCE = new Foo();
     }
  }
  return INSTANCE;
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
Using a String as a lock?? (If you want to give the lock a name, make it an instance of a nested class. That was it'll even appear in stack dumps.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 28 '11 at 15:06
    
But I am using a final String varible as lock, even it appears in stack dumps, it would not have any impaction(just need make sure this lock is only used for there.). –  C.c Nov 28 '11 at 15:19
3  
It's an interned String - shared across the entire process nom atter where the code came from. / The dump (^Z, jstack or whatever) will just show that it is a java.lang.String and nothing more specific. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 28 '11 at 15:24
    
(I notice the second piece of code has two locks. I'm not a big fan of synchronized on methods, mostly because it locks you to the public lock, but also can be overlooked as here.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 24 '11 at 13:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.