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What is the most efficient way to code "print all the elements of a vector to standard out" in C++,

for(std::vector<int>::iterator it = intVect.begin(); it != intVect.end(); ++i)
std::cout << *it;

or

std::copy(intVect.begin(), intVect.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout));

and why?

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4  
Define "best". –  Pubby Nov 28 '11 at 15:38
3  
Are you unable to profile both and compare the results? –  jweyrich Nov 28 '11 at 15:38
    
efficient=speed –  user677656 Nov 28 '11 at 15:45
3  
Do you seriously think it matters? You're streaming out to a stream, the overhead of that operation will simply dwarf any looping overhead. Focus on clear-concise code that's easy to read and maintain. –  Nim Nov 28 '11 at 15:50
1  
Are you really trying to ask if there is a performance implication between using a hand-written for loop versus using the std::copy algorithm? –  John Dibling Nov 28 '11 at 16:26
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you are asking which of methods you've posted will be faster, the only valid answer can be:

There is no way to know for sure because they are equivalent. You must profile them both and see for yourself.

This is because the two methods are effectively the same. The do the same thing, but they use different mechanisms to do it. By the time your compiler's optimizer has finished with the code, it may have found different opportunities to increase execution speed, or it may have found opportunities in each that result in identical machine code being executed.

For example, consider:

for(std::vector<int>::iterator it = intVect.begin(); it != intVect.end(); ++i)

At first blush, it might seem like this could have a built-in inefficiency by the fact that intVect.end() is evaluated at each loop. This would make this method slower than,

std::copy(intVect.begin(), intVect.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout));

...where it is only evaluated once.

However, depending on the surrounding code and your compiler's settings, it might be re-written so that it is only evaluated once, at the beginning of the for. (Credit: @SteveJessop) Or it might even be that it isn't hoisted, but evaluating it is no different from examining a pre-computed value. It's possible that either way, the emitted code must load a pointer value from (stack pointer) + (small offset known at compile time). The only way to know for sure is to compile them both and examine the resulting assembly code.

Beyond all of this however is a more fundamental issue. You are asking which method of doing something is faster, when the core thing you're trying to do is potentially very slow to begin with, relative to the means by which you do it. If you are writing to stdout using streams, it is going to have negligible effect on the overall execution time whether you use a for loop or std::copy even if one is marginally faster than the other. If your concern is overall execution time, you're possibly barking up the wrong tree.

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1  
"it might be re-written so that it is only evaluated once, at the beginning of the for" - or it might even be that it isn't hoisted, but evaluating it is no different from examining a pre-computed value. It's possible that either way, the emitted code must load a pointer value from (stack pointer) + (small offset known at compile time). –  Steve Jessop Nov 28 '11 at 16:31
    
@Steve: Nice observation, may I incorporate your words in to my answer? –  John Dibling Nov 28 '11 at 16:32
    
sure, I think I've finished editing them now :-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 28 '11 at 16:33
    
Incorporated. Feed free to edit if you wish. –  John Dibling Nov 28 '11 at 16:36
1  
+1 for the answer I couldn't be bothered to write.. :) –  Nim Nov 28 '11 at 16:39
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You can use

http://louisdx.github.com/cxx-prettyprint/

and rely on the work of other people that made sure it will be most optimal.

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3  
+1. I liked that someone is also liking the utility. Its getting popular. Congrats @Kerrek SB –  Nawaz Nov 28 '11 at 15:42
    
I am uncertain that your answer constitutes a response to "why" as well, and it seems vague to me. –  user677656 Nov 28 '11 at 15:48
    
@g24l Strictly saying that wasn't answer to your question but it was a recommendation how you can omit this dilemma. –  Beginner Nov 28 '11 at 15:50
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Thanks for the props :-) Contributors welcome, by the way, especially for the C++98 version. Also comments on whether I got the ADL for begin/end right. –  Kerrek SB Nov 28 '11 at 15:53
    
@ Roman B. Still it is not an answer, and I do not want to omit the dilemma, but clarify it. –  user677656 Nov 28 '11 at 18:25
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These two lines will end up doing essentially the same thing (almost definitely) once the compiler gets through with them. Either way you will end up with the same code looping through using iterators in range of {begin, end-1} using the same streams.

This is a micro-optimization that will not help you significantly, though I'm sure you can compile it with a big data set and see for yourself easily on your platform.

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