Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is a common thing that I have been needing to do recently and I was looking for any common patterns to make this a little easier.

The main gist of it all is that I have some data models, which are modelled to satisfy the ORM and purely do CRUD operations to objects. These models are currently exposed via repositories/factories (dependant upon if its C or RUD).

I then have a view model, which is a bit more readable, and is sprinkled with UI concerns, such as validation and mapping data between the view (this is an ASP.MVC scenario but this situation can be abstracted to most situations).

So lets say I go to localhost/user/1, that should go and get me the user with an Id 1 in the DB and then display it on the UI. Ultimately this has to pull data down from the data domain and then map it to a ui model for display purposes.

Here is an example scenario:

public class OrmUser
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public IList<Permission> Permissions {get;set;}
}

public class UiUser
{
    [Required]
    public int Id {get;set;}
    [Required]
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public bool IsUserAdmin {get;set;}
}

public class UserMapper : IMapper<UiUser>
{
    public UiUser Get(int id)
    {
        var ormUser = UserRepository.Get(id);
        var uiUser = new UiUser
        {
            Id = ormUser.Id,
            Name = ormUser.Name,
            IsUserAdmin = IsUserAdmin(ormUser.Permissions)
        }
    }

    private bool IsUserAdmin(IList<Permission> permissions)
    {
        return permissions.SomeLinq(ToFindIfTheyAreAnAdmin);
    }
}

This is a simple example but shows how a data model, contains a lot of the same sort of information, but at this view in question you do not care about all the information just a subset of it. This way having a mapper you get to abstract not only the mapping but the communication with the data domain, however you need to write a mapper class for each type, and the above assumes it is a one way mapping, not a 2 way mapping which would require some more code.

So how do you all go about carrying out this mapping? As currently I have just been writing abstraction mappers which basically allow the UI layer to run a query, and get back a view model, abstracting the repositories and the copying data from one model to another, and it just feels like there should be a better way to do this.

share|improve this question
    
As for me guestion is pretty abstract, what exactly are you want to map? – sll Nov 28 '11 at 15:54
    
Well its not a specific model, it is meant to be a bit abstract. I am sure most web applications these days have multiple tiers/domains which contain the similar models to represent the same sort of data. I am just looking at a good pattern to manage the mapping and communication between the layers. Will add some dummy models to my original question to help see what im after, although Paul has given a good answer so far. – Grofit Nov 28 '11 at 16:01
    
Also it is worth noting that although this is a .net example, the same situation can occur in any language really. So any language agnostic patterns would be ideal, although frameworks to ease this task for given platforms are good too... – Grofit Nov 28 '11 at 16:23
    
considering that Automapper would be a good choice – sll Nov 28 '11 at 17:37
    
@Arnis L. A logical grouping of classes and models pertaining to just dealing with your data sources, i.e Nhibernate, MongoDb etc. As you would not use the same model to persist your entities in Nhibernate as you would to display them to the UI, hence the data/ui domain distinction. – Grofit Dec 1 '11 at 11:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In .net you should probably take a look at Automapper

https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper

It essentially allows you to do:

CreateMap<Domain.Customer, ViewModel.Customer>()

And you can then map between the two by saying:

var vmCustomer = Mapper.Map<Domain.Customer, ViewModel.Customer>(domainCustomer);

It will likely save you a ton of boiler plate code.

share|improve this answer

Yes. AutoMapper is the tool for you. There are ton's of article about this, but go to the source - Jimmy Bogard. He's the master mind behind AutoMapper.

Look at this blog article http://lostechies.com/jimmybogard/2009/06/30/how-we-do-mvc-view-models/

AutoMapper now days support MVC in a very efficient way where you can decorate your classes with attributes on what mapping should be done.

/Best Regards Magnus

share|improve this answer
    
Adding attributes to both sides would dirty things even more, I am trying to come up with a clean abstraction for both sides. Although you are right for .net it seems like auto mapper is the choice. Was hoping for more language agnostic solutions but I guess the principle behind AutoMapper and ValueInjector etc can be applied to other languages/platforms. – Grofit Nov 29 '11 at 13:54
1  
I haven't used Jimmys latest addon to MVC, so you can use Attributes. And yes it gets a little dirty. And it also depends how similar your domain model is to your view model. If you need to help AutoMapper a lot, it's better to skip attributes and use AutoMapper like normal (mapping config files). But mapping is cross cutting concerns for me, so I move out the mapping into a separate project and wrap it into Facade (IAssamble). You can then inject that IAssemble service interface where you want it. I you like to replace AutoMapper - do it. But IAssemble interface can still be intact. – Magnus Backeus Nov 30 '11 at 9:47

In this particular case, I might just write an extension method for User in my presentation layer.

public static class UserPresentationExtensions{
 public bool IsAdmin(this User user){
  return permissions.SomeLinq(ToFindIfTheyAreAnAdmin);
 }
}

View would look something like this:

@model User
<fieldset>
 <legend>User: @Model.Name</legend>
 @if(user.IsAdmin()){
  User is an admin
 }
</fieldset>

To avoid importing namespace repeatedly, would use web.config for that:

<configuration>
 <system.web.webPages.razor>
  <pages pageBaseType="System.Web.Mvc.WebViewPage">
   <namespaces>
    <add namespace="MyProject.PresentationExtensions" />
   ...

You have a point, however lets say you want to add validation to your models, so you decide to add a [Required] attribute to your Name property. Although then if you use a shared model then your data layer needs to know about the annotations, and if your data layer had to have some attributes your UI layer would need to know about them. In the simplest of situations you are right, sometimes it is easier to just have 1 model being the truth, and just access it in a different way, but for most complex projects you will find yourself dirtying both sides to try and save a few lines of code.

I said - in this particular case. This approach applies only if mapping isn't really worth it and there's only 1-way communication (you just need to render it).

When it comes to receiving posts, it gets bit different. Most "one size fits all" approach would be applying so called Thunderdome principle. That is:

All Controller methods take in one ViewModel object (or zero objects in some cases) and return a single ViewModel object (one object enters, one object leaves).

However, quite often I prefer going extension/html helper way and just pass according arguments to action like this:

public void BatheCat(int id /* cat id */, int bathId, string shampoo){
 ...
}

If parameter count gets out of control (I don't bother while it's <= 3), I just encapsulate them (here's an example from my project).

share|improve this answer
    
This way you would need to write an extension method, or custom logic of some sort for almost every model or field you wanted to map. It is a valid solution to the problem though, I just dont think it would lead to a manageable codebase when you start having 10+ models in different domains. – Grofit Dec 1 '11 at 11:36
    
@Grofit Sometimes this is much simpler than mapping view models that look the same as domain model. That is my point. – Arnis L. Dec 1 '11 at 11:40
    
You have a point, however lets say you want to add validation to your models, so you decide to add a [Required] attribute to your Name property. Although then if you use a shared model then your data layer needs to know about the annotations, and if your data layer had to have some attributes your UI layer would need to know about them. In the simplest of situations you are right, sometimes it is easier to just have 1 model being the truth, and just access it in a different way, but for most complex projects you will find yourself dirtying both sides to try and save a few lines of code. – Grofit Dec 1 '11 at 11:44
    
@Grofit edited answer instead of commenting – Arnis L. Dec 1 '11 at 12:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.