Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class with 2 constructors:

public class Lens
{
    public Lens(string parameter1)
    {
        //blabla
    }

    public Lens(string parameter1, string parameter2)
    {
       // want to call constructor with 1 param here..
    }
}

I want to call the first constructor from the 2nd one. Is this possible in C#?

share|improve this question
up vote 105 down vote accepted

Append :this(reqd params) at the end of the ctor to do 'constructor chaining'

public Test( bool a, int b, string c )
    : this( a, b )
{
    this.m_C = c;
}
public Test( bool a, int b, float d )
    : this( a, b )
{
    this.m_D = d;
}
private Test( bool a, int b )
{
    this.m_A = a;
    this.m_B = b;
}

Source Courtesy of csharp411.com

share|improve this answer
    
That was pretty easy.. thanks! – Robbert Dam May 6 '09 at 14:30

Yes, you'd use the following

public class Lens
{
    public Lens(string parameter1)
    {
       //blabla
    }

    public Lens(string parameter1, string parameter2) : this(parameter1)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think what would happen in the second constructor is that you'd create a local instance of Lens which goes out of scope at the end of the constructor and is NOT assigned to "this". You need to use the constructor chaining syntax in Gishu's post to achieve what the question asks. – Colin Desmond May 6 '09 at 14:31
    
Yup, sorry about that. Corrected now. – Matthew Dresser May 6 '09 at 14:33

This is an addition to the conversation and a situation that I encountered, today, working on some code: the order of constructor evaluation must also be taken into consideration when chaining constructors:

To borrow from Gishu's answer, a bit (to keep code somewhat similar):

public Test(bool a, int b, string c)
    : this(a, b)
{
    this.C = c;
}

private Test(bool a, int b)
{
    this.A = a;
    this.B = b;
}

If we change the evalution performed in the private constructor, slightly, we will see why constructor ordering is important:

private Test(bool a, int b)
{
    // ... remember that this is called by the public constructor
    // with `this(...`

    if (hasValue(this.C)) 
    {  
         // ...
    }

    this.A = a;
    this.B = b;
}

Above, I have added a bogus function call that determines whether property C has a value. At first glance, it might seem that C would have a value -- it is set in the calling constructor; however, it is important to remember that constructors are functions.

this(a, b) is called - and must "return" - before the public constructor's body is performed. Stated differently, the last constructor called is the first constructor evaluated. In this case, private is evaluated before public (just to use the visibility as the identifier).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.