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It is well known that C# class can inherit only from a Single Base class How does it make sense because all classes derive from System.Object?

Also, If I look into class ValueType definition (for example), which i know that inherits directly from System.Object, i see that it is just an abstract class. i expect to see: public abstract class ValueType : System.Object

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, Frank van Puffelen, Jesse, rekire May 12 '13 at 14:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Classes can also inherit from classes that inherit from Object. Or they can inherit from classes that inherit from classes that inherit from Object. Or... –  Mike Christensen Nov 28 '11 at 17:11
1  
What's your question? Yes all classes are objects and each class can only inherit from one base class. –  Maess Nov 28 '11 at 17:12

9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Inheritance is most easily visualized as a hierarchy or tree. See if this makes sense:

                     System.Object
                     /           \
                    /             \
                   /               \
MyProject.SomeClass                 MyProject.SomeBaseClass
                                         /           \
                                        /             \
                                       /               \
                   MyProject.SomeDerivedClass     MyProject.SomeOtherDerivedClass

Looking at MyProject.SomeDerivedClass, you can clearly see that it has exactly one parent in the hierarchy, its base class, MyProject.SomeBaseClass. Now, MyProject.SomeBaseClass has exactly one parent as well, System.Object.

While MyProject.SomeDerivedClass doesn't directly inherit from System.Object, its parent does; everything the parent either inherits or provides is passed on to the derived object. So, even though MyProject.SomeDerivedClass only inherits directly from MyProject.SomeBaseClass, it still inherits from System.Object because its parent does so.

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Thank you for your answer, –  user829174 Nov 28 '11 at 17:24
    
However if I look into class ValueType definition (for example), which i know that inherits directly from System.Object, i see that it is just an abstract class. i expect to see: public abstract class ValueType : System.Object –  user829174 Nov 28 '11 at 17:28
4  
When a class doesn't specify what its base class is, it inherits from System.Object by default. That's why public abstract class ValueType and public abstract class ValueType : System.Object are identical. –  Adam Maras Nov 28 '11 at 17:31

It is well known that C# class can inherit only from a single base class.

That is not well-known because that statement is absolutely false. In C# a class can inherit members from arbitrarily many base classes and interfaces.

You have confused the inherits-members-from-type relationship with the directly-derives-from-type relationship.

The actual rule is that every class except System.Object derives directly from exactly one class. System.Object is unique in that it is the only class that derives directly from nothing.

Every class and every interface can derive directly from arbitrarily many interfaces.

A class or interface inherits the members of every class or interface that it derives from, either directly or indirectly. The "direct or indirect derivation" relationship is the transitive closure of the direct derivation relationship.

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Because you are inheriting indirectly from object; for example

Object <= Foo <= Bar <= Blap

Hence object is the root of all managed types (but not quite all types; raw unsafe pointers do not inherit from object, for example).

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1  
Inheritance arrows usually point the other way... –  Henk Holterman Nov 28 '11 at 17:17
    
@henk fine I'll fix them. In all honesty, I never get very excited by such things. My uml sucks majorly: –  Marc Gravell Nov 28 '11 at 18:25
    
OK, I'll shut up about the arrow styles then. –  Henk Holterman Nov 28 '11 at 18:57

Whatever base class you inherit from, eventually you will indirectly derive from System.Object

so for example

public myConreteClass : myBaseClass
{}

public myBaseClass : System.Object
{}

However long the chain goes on the either bottom class that may or may not inherit from something will inherit from System.Object

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Class A derives from Class B which derives from System.Object.

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As per the documentation:

This is the ultimate base class of all classes in the .NET Framework; it is the root of the type hierarchy.

The key word there is hierarchy.

So this means that (in some imaginary application) a class called Cat could inherit from Mammal which might inherit from Animal, which would then inherit from System.Object.

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All classes inherit from object since if we have

public class Foo {}

This is the same as writing:

public class Foo : object {}

And if Bar subclasses Foo:

public class Bar : Foo {}

Then we're still good, since Foo inherits from object, so does Bar.

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C# class can inherit from only a single Base class and other classes can inherit from the same class too, so multiple classes can inherit from the same class but each calss inherit from only one class.

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You can achieve this inheriting from one type at the time:

let's say you have a type Object

public class Object { } 

then you have a type called String, you can have string inheriting from object

public class String : Object { } 

Then you create a class called StringWithColors inheriting from String

public class StringWithColors : String { } 

at this point, your new class StringWithColors will have inherited from String and Object.. and so on...

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