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I have a (legacy) table that has columns in it:

bug_num   build_id    closed_to
1         3            NULL
2         4            NULL
3         NULL         1
4         3            NULL
5         NULL         2

I want to write a query where it will select all bugs from a specific build, and all bugs that were closed to a bug in that build. So, if I wanted to do it for build 3, it would include #s 1 and 4 (since they're in build 3) and also 3, since it was closed to a bug in build 3 (1).

I thought I was close with:

SELECT stat.bug_num, 
       stat.build_id 
FROM   bug_status stat 
       JOIN bug_status stat2 
         ON stat2.closed_to = stat.bug_num 
WHERE  stat.build_id = 3; 

...but it doesn't seem to be giving me the desired result. Thanks for your help!

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to clarify, "closed to" is not a build id, it's a bug number. –  pennstatephil Nov 28 '11 at 18:10
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT stat.bug_num,
       stat.build_id
  FROM bug_status  stat
 WHERE stat.build_id = 3
    OR stat.closed_to IN
        ( SELECT stat2.bug_num
            FROM bug_status  stat2
           WHERE stat2.build_id = 3
        )
;

(It's also possible to do this with a JOIN, or with a JOIN and a UNION, but I believe the above is the most intuitive way.)


Edited to add: Here is a MySQL transcript demonstrating the above:

mysql> create table bug_status
    -> (bug_num numeric, build_id numeric, closed_to numeric);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> insert into bug_status values (1, 3, null);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into bug_status values (2, 4, null);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> insert into bug_status values (3, null, 1);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into bug_status values (4, 3, null);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into bug_status values (5, null, 2);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT stat.bug_num,
    ->        stat.build_id
    ->   FROM bug_status  stat
    ->  WHERE stat.build_id = 3
    ->     OR stat.closed_to IN
    ->         ( SELECT stat2.bug_num
    ->             FROM bug_status  stat2
    ->            WHERE stat2.build_id = 3
    ->         )
    -> ;
+---------+----------+
| bug_num | build_id |
+---------+----------+
|       1 |        3 |
|       3 |     NULL |
|       4 |        3 |
+---------+----------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Edited to add, since the IN (...) approach doesn't seem to work in the OP's version of MySQL: Here is an alternative query that gives the same result:

SELECT stat.bug_num,
       stat.build_id
  FROM bug_status  stat
  LEFT
 OUTER
  JOIN bug_status  stat2
    ON stat.closed_to = stat2.bug_num
 WHERE stat.build_id = 3
    OR stat2.build_id = 3
;
share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately, the build ID is cleared out when a bug is closed to another bug, since it's unknown when the other bug will actually be implemented, so I need to map closed_to to bug_num directly... –  pennstatephil Nov 28 '11 at 18:19
    
on rereading, it looked like your solution might work, but for some reason the sql doesnt seem to like the nested query. –  pennstatephil Nov 28 '11 at 18:24
    
@pennstatephil: That's odd. I just tested my query on MySQL version 5.1.53, and it returned exactly the right rows. Is it possible you mis-copied something? –  ruakh Nov 28 '11 at 18:31
    
@pennstatephil: Whoops, sorry, I typo'd, writing stat instead of stat2 in the subquery. Will update my answer. –  ruakh Nov 28 '11 at 18:37
1  
@pennstatephil: Yeah, I guess it must be because of the difference in MySQL versions. I've added an alternative version, that uses a LEFT OUTER JOIN rather than an IN (SELECT ...) -- actually, I think it's identical to what Branko Dimitrijevic is suggesting in the comments to knittl's answer -- care to give it a try? –  ruakh Nov 28 '11 at 18:59
show 6 more comments

You are not including stat2.build_id in your WHERE clause (and I think your ON columns taken from the wrong tables):

SELECT stat.bug_num, stat.build_id
FROM bug_status stat
LEFT JOIN bug_status stat2
ON stat.closed_to = stat2.bug_num
WHERE stat.build_id = 3 OR stat2.build_id = 3
share|improve this answer
    
weird... if I take out the where clause altogether, it gives a bunch of rows with bug id 0 and build id null. seems the join isnt hooking the tables together properly? –  pennstatephil Nov 28 '11 at 18:17
    
That isn't right. There are several problems with it; for example, stat2.build_id = 3 will never be true, because bug_status.build_id IS NULL whenever bug_status.closed_to IS NOT NULL (at least in the example data in the question). –  ruakh Nov 28 '11 at 18:21
1  
Try ON stat.closed_to = stat2.bug_num –  knittl Nov 28 '11 at 18:21
    
@ruakh: yes, but we don't join on build_id, but on closed_to <-> bug_num –  knittl Nov 28 '11 at 18:24
1  
@knittl Good idea, but you need LEFT JOIN. After you fix that, your query will return the correct result. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Nov 28 '11 at 18:46
show 6 more comments

Why not:

DECLARE  @build_id int = <the build id>

SELECT   stat.bug_num, stat.build_id, stat.closed_to
FROM     bug_status stat
WHERE    stat.build_id = @build_id 
   OR    stat.closed_to = @build_id

?

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+1 on the SQL but the syntax looks like TSQL and not MySQL. You're probably better off removing the declare and put in literal values in your answer and let the OP figure out how to deal with parameters –  Conrad Frix Nov 28 '11 at 18:10
3  
closed_to maps to bug_num and not to build_id –  knittl Nov 28 '11 at 18:11
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This query...

SELECT *
FROM bug_status t1
WHERE
    build_id = 3
    OR EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM bug_status t2
        WHERE
            t2.build_id = 3
            AND t1.closed_to = t2.bug_num
    )

...produces the following result:

bug_num   build_id    closed_to
1         3           NULL
3         NULL        1
4         3           NULL

In plain English: select the rows such that:

  • build_id = 3
  • or there is a related row with build_id = 3.
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