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I have a template function specified:

template<class T> void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, T &value) {
    ...

    if(parseWhat == PARSE_UID) {
        value = json_object_getInt(val);
    }
    if(parseWhar == PARSE_EMAIL) {
        value = json_object_getString(val);
    }
    ...
}

Now when I want to parse the uid of the json-object I call the method with an int:

json_object* obj = ...;
int uid = 0;
jsonParse(obj,PARSE_UID,uid);

But then a compile error occurs at the assignment in line:

value = json_object_getString(val);

Because of the call with an int the compiler thinks that the type of the variable value is int and json_object_getString(val) returns const char*. So the compiler says: can not convert from const char* to int.

Have you got any suggestion to solve this problem?

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1  
how is value defined? is it the T &value in the parameter list? –  Hunter McMillen Nov 28 '11 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why are you even using a template if you are going to do a switch statement of a bunch of if statements for each type? Your template instantiation will never compile if you want to treat every type as multiple types. This design is flawed but if you must then you can use specializations to accomplish something similar.

template<class T> void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, T &value) {
    static_assert(false); // not a handled type
}

template<> void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, int &value) {
    value = json_object_getInt(val);
}

template<> void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, std::string &value) {
    value = json_object_getString(val);
}

As GMan points out it is usually preferable to overload functions rather than specialize a function template. The equivalent using an overloaded function would be something like this:

void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, int &value) {
        value = json_object_getInt(val);
    }

void jsonParse(json_object* jobj, eParseWhat parseWhat, std::string &value) {
        value = json_object_getString(val);
    }
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2  
Better just to use overloads, then. –  GManNickG Nov 28 '11 at 19:40
    
Correct GMan the template seems completely unnecessary. –  AJG85 Nov 28 '11 at 19:45
    
Thanks for your quick answers guys! I recognized that using a template in this case isn't a good solution...I think I will overload the function with the different types...and i will take a look at boost:any ;) –  Tobi Weißhaar Nov 28 '11 at 19:57
    
You can get started by reading this comparison of boost::variant to boost::any boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/doc/html/variant/… –  AJG85 Nov 28 '11 at 20:01

Didn't you intend to write:

    if(parseWhat == PARSE_UID) {
        value = json_object_getInt(val);
    }
    else if(parseWhar == PARSE_EMAIL) {
        value = json_object_getString(val);
    }

On a sidenote: template usage in your example is quite strange and confusing to me. I'd rather use some kind of Variant class for this (one example is boost::any, but you can easily implement your own - it's a matter of two hours).

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boost::any isn't a variant class, boost::variant is. –  GManNickG Nov 28 '11 at 20:40
    
@GMan: I didn't use it, but the description says it IS a variant class –  Violet Giraffe Nov 28 '11 at 20:50
1  
Boost.Any offers a dynamic variant, Boost.Variant offers a static variant. With the way the code is being used, I would agree with @GMan that a static variant is warranted here. –  ildjarn Nov 28 '11 at 23:34

Your code won't compile in any way, cause in that method T value can't be int and char* at the same time...

You try to cast differnt types (one is a int, on is a char) to a value (that isn't even defined) ;)

First you have to use:

json_object* obj = ...;
int uid = 0;

jsonParse<int>(obj,PARSE_UID,uid); //last parameter is int

or

jsonParse<string>(obj,PARSE_UID,whatever); //last parameter is string

But that don't work, as said before... you can't use a type in two diffrent ways in one template...

Sorry... :)

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Yeah, nice answer JG85! –  DirkMausF Nov 28 '11 at 20:01
    
I thought with a trick it would be possible ;) –  Tobi Weißhaar Nov 28 '11 at 21:46

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