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I'm encountering a very strange issue in a python script I've written. This is the piece of code that is producing abnormal results:

EDIT: I've included the entire loop in the code segment now.

data = open(datafile,'r')
outERROR = open(outERRORfile,'w')
precision=[0]
scale=[0]
lines = data.readlines()
limit = 0
if filetype == 'd':
    for line in lines:
            limit += 1
            if limit > checklimit:
                    break
            columns = line.split(fieldDelimiter)
            for i in range(len(columns) - len(precision)):
                            precision.append(0)
            for i in range(len(columns) - len(scale)):
                            scale.append(0)
            if len(datatype) != len(precision):
                    sys.exit() #Exits the script if the number of data types (fields found in the DDL file) doesn't match the number of columns found in the data file
            i = -1
            for eachcolumn in columns:
                    i += 1
                    if len(rstrip(columns[i])) > precision[i]:
                            precision[i] = len(rstrip(columns[i]))
                    if columns[i].find('.') != -1 and (len(rstrip(columns[i])) - rstrip(columns[i]).find('.')) > scale[i]:
                            scale[i] = len(rstrip(columns[i])) - rstrip(columns[i]).find('.') -1
                    if datatype[i][0:7] == 'integer':
                            if int(columns[i]) < -2147483648 or int(columns[i]) > 2147483647:
                                    outERROR.write("Integer value too high or too low to fit inside Integer data type, column: " + str(i + 1) + ", value: " + columns[i] + "\n")
                    if datatype[i][0:9] == 'smallint':
                            if int(columns[i]) < -32768 or int(columns[i]) > 32767:
                                    outERROR.write("Smallint value too high or too low to fit inside Smallint data type, column: " + str(i + 1) + ", value: " + columns[i] + "\n")
                    if datatype[i][0:7] == 'byteint':
                            if int(columns[i]) < -128 or int(columns[i]) > 127:
                                    outERROR.write("Byteint value too high or too low to fit inside Byteint data type, column: " + str(i + 1) + ", value: " + columns[i] + "\n")
                    if datatype[i][0:4] == 'date':
                            if DateParse(columns[i],format1[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            elif DateParse(columns[i],format2[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            elif DateParse(columns[i],format3[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            else:
                                    outERROR.write('Date format error, column: ' + str(i + 1) + ', value: ' + columns[i])
                    if datatype[i][0:9] == 'timestamp':
                            if DateParse(columns[i],timestamp1[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            elif DateParse(columns[i],timestamp2[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            elif DateParse(columns[i],timestamp3[i]) > -1:
                                    pass
                            else:
                                    outERROR.write('Timestamp format error, column: ' + str(i + 1) + ', value: ' + columns[i] + '\n')
                    if (datatype[i][0:7] == 'decimal'
                    or datatype[i][0:7] == 'integer'
                    or datatype[i][0:7] == 'byteint'
                    or datatype[i][0:5] == 'float'
                    or datatype[i][0:8] == 'smallint'):
                            try:
                                    y = float(columns[i])
                            except ValueError:
                                    outERROR.write('Character found in numeric data type, column: ' + str(i + 1) + ', value: ' + columns[i] + "\n")
                    else:
                            pass

This is part of a loop that reads a data file, basically its checking the type of the data (to determine if its supposed to be a numeric type) and 'trying' to turn it into a float to see if its actually numeric data in the data file. If its not numeric data it outputs the error you see above to a text file (defined currently as outERROR). Now when I wrote this and tested it on a small data file (4 lines) it worked fine, but when I run this on a larger file (several thousand rows) my error file is suddenly filling with a bunch of blank spaces, and only a few of the error messages are being created.

Here is what the error file looks like when I run the script with 4 rows:

Character found in numeric data type, column: 6, value: 24710a35
Character found in numeric data type, column: 7, value: 0a04
Character found in numeric data type, column: 8, value: 0a02
Character found in numeric data type, column: 6, value: 56688a12
Character found in numeric data type, column: 7, value: 0a09
Character found in numeric data type, column: 8, value: 0a06
Character found in numeric data type, column: 6, value: 12301a04
Character found in numeric data type, column: 7, value: 0a10
Character found in numeric data type, column: 8, value: 0a02
Character found in numeric data type, column: 6, value: 25816a56
Character found in numeric data type, column: 7, value: 0a09
Character found in numeric data type, column: 8, value: 0a06

This is the expected output.

When I run it on larger files, I start to get blank spaces at the top of the error file, and only the last 40-50 or so error writes actually get output as text in the file. The larger the file, the more blank spaces it outputs. I'm completely lost on this, I've read some of the other questions regarding mysterious blank lines and spaces on stackoverflow.com here but they dont seem to address my issue.

EDIT: outERROR is the name I've given to the error file that the output is writing to. It is a simple .txt file.

This is a sample of the data file:

257|1463|64|1|7|9551a22|0a05|0a02|N|O|1998-06-18|1998-05-15|1998-06-27|COLLECT COD|FOB|ackages sleep bold realmsa f|
258|1062|68|1|8|7704a48|0a00|0a07|R|F|1994-01-20|1994-03-21|1994-02-09|NONE|REG AIR|ully about the fluffily silent dependencies|
258|1962|95|2|40|74558a40|0a10|0a01|A|F|1994-03-13|1994-02-23|1994-04-05|DELIVER IN PERSON|FOB|silent frets nod daringly busy, bold|
258|1618|19|3|45|68382a45|0a07|0a07|R|F|1994-03-04|1994-02-13|1994-03-30|DELIVER IN PERSON|TRUCK|regular excuses-- fluffily ruthl|

Specifically the columns that are causing output to the error file are:

|9551a22|0a05|0a02|
|7704a48|0a00|0a07|
|74558a40|0a10|0a01|
|68382a45|0a07|0a07|

So each line should cause 3 writes to the error file, specifying these values. It works fine for a small number of lines, but when it reads a large number of lines I start getting these mysterious blank spaces. This problem occurs only when I have numeric fields that contain characters.

share|improve this question
    
What is outERROR, exactly? –  Hamish Nov 28 '11 at 19:34
    
The error doesn't appear to be in the code that you've posted. We'll need to see the loop that iterates over the input file or other related parts of the code. –  g.d.d.c Nov 28 '11 at 19:35
2  
Nothing in your code sample prints out a blank line, which suggests that the error may not be in the piece of code you've posted. Is there any way you could link to a runnable script and sample data file that demonstrates the problem? –  David Z Nov 28 '11 at 19:36
    
are you closing the out file? –  F.C. Nov 28 '11 at 20:11
    
I've included the rest of the loop. Nothing anywhere should print a blank line, but I'm now wondering if the section where it makes comparisons of the data to actual integers, specifically: if datatype[i][0:7] == 'integer': if int(columns[i]) < -2147483648 or int(columns[i]) > 2147483647: outERROR.write("Integer value too high or too low to fit inside Integer data type, column: " + str(i + 1) + ", value: " + columns[i] + "\n") is causing the problem. The outfile is closed at the end of the script. –  W P Nov 28 '11 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

At a guess, perhaps you have control characters in the input stream that cause some unexpected behaviour. No sure exactly what outERROR is in the above context, but you can imagine, for example, that a form feed character in the input could have this sort of effect.

Try cleaning the data of non-printable characters first and see if that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
There are only numbers and alpha characters (a-z) in the input file. –  W P Nov 28 '11 at 20:09
2  
@WP: How do you KNOW that? Hint: "I looked at it with a text editor" is NOT an acceptable answer. In any case if as your code suggests, your file is divided into lines, that statement is incorrect; the file must contain control codes. –  John Machin Nov 28 '11 at 20:29
    
@John Machin: I created the data file. The field delimiter is a pipe '|'. I should clarify, there are only numbers and alpha characters in the data that comparisons are being made on that can cause a line to be printed to the error file. There are dashes present in some of the 'date' data, and commas and periods in some of the character fields, but that data isnt being compared to anything or output to the error file, so a misinterpretation shouldn't occur there. I should also mention that this problem only occurs when I run it on a data file with characters present in numeric fields. –  W P Nov 28 '11 at 20:52
    
@WP: We've run out of crystal balls. Post ACTUAL code and data (preferably the smallest number of lines that will reproduce the problem), PLUS generated output file, somewhere, and state what version of Python and what version of what OS you are using. Otherwise start doing some elementary debugging. –  John Machin Nov 28 '11 at 21:58

Call open with 'rb' and 'wb' to ensure binary mode, otherwise the data can be altered by the system trying to mess with line endings

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, all this does is mess with the formatting of the output file. The blank spaces are still there and it doesn't appear to honor the newlines. –  W P Nov 28 '11 at 20:20
    
-1 Binary mode can only make it worse. Input and output are text information, so should be opened in text mode. –  John Machin Nov 28 '11 at 21:54

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