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I'm given a sequence interface and a last distribution digit class along with square sequence classes as an example. Now I have to come up with a prime number sequence that implements the sequence interface. I've come up with an algorithm but I'm having trouble to as to I'm going to implement the interface or return the value.

Last Distribution Class

public class LastDigitDistribution
{
   private int[] counters;

   // Constructs a distribution whose counters are set to zero.
   public LastDigitDistribution()
   {
     counters = new int[10];
   }

  /**
     Processes values from this sequence.
     @param seq the sequence from which to obtain the values
     @param valuesToProcess the number of values to process
  */
  public void process(Sequence seq, int valuesToProcess)
  {
    for (int i = 1; i <= valuesToProcess; i++)
     {
        int value = seq.next();
        int lastDigit = value % 10;
        counters[lastDigit]++;
     }
  }

  // Displays the counter values of this distribution.
  public void display()
  {
    for (int i = 0; i < counters.length; i++)
    {
        System.out.println(i + ": " + counters[i]);
    }
  }
}

The Sequence Interface

public interface Sequence
{
    int next();
}

SquareSequence Class

public class SquareSequence implements Sequence
{
    private int n;

    public int next()
    {
        n++;
       return n*n;
    }

The Random Sequence Class

public class RandomSequence implements Sequence
{
    public int next()
    {
        return (int) (Integer.MAX_VALUE * Math.random());
    }
}

The Demo/Tester Class for The Sequence

public class SequenceDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
          LastDigitDistribution dist1 = new LastDigitDistribution();
          dist1.process(new SquareSequence(), 100);
          dist1.display();
          System.out.println();

          LastDigitDistribution dist2 = new LastDigitDistribution();
          dist2.process(new RandomSequence(), 1000);
          dist2.display();
       }
}

Now I have to introduce a primesequence class this is what I've come up with so far the prime number algorithm is fine I just don't know how to implement it and relate it with this sequence.

public class SquareSequence implements Sequence
{
   private int n;

   public int next()
   {{          
        for (int i = 1; i < n; i++ ){
           int j;
           for (j=2; j<i; j++){
           int k = i%j;
           if (k==0){
           break;
           }
           }
           if(i == j){
           System.out.print("  "+i);             
           }               
       }
        return n;       
  }    
  }
}

Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
Homework? Do u know how to test prime? –  taskinoor Nov 28 '11 at 19:38
    
The algorithm I've come up with prints as many prime numbers as you define so I don't think I need to come up with a code that tests prime. As that's not what the question has asked me. –  user1069755 Nov 28 '11 at 19:44
    
"The algorithm I've come up with prints as many prime numbers as you define" - how the algorithm can say a number is prime or not and print primes without testing prime? –  taskinoor Nov 29 '11 at 6:12

3 Answers 3

First I would name the class something like PrimeSequence but keep it implementing Sequence. To implement that class using your algorithm, all you need to do is implement the next() method in such a way that it returns the next prime.

Basically initialize n to the first prime number (2) upon construction of the class. For each call to next(); return the first prime you find that is larger than n (restricting your search to numbers n+1 and greater) and then set n to that newly found prime before returning it.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I forgot to change the name of the class, I think I understand it and let me try this out too, I 'll get back to you if I have any problems. Thanks a lot! –  user1069755 Nov 28 '11 at 19:57
    
@user1069755 how did it work out? –  Zugwalt Nov 29 '11 at 17:49

You should name your class PrimeSequence (or similar) to describe it and have it implement the interface Sequence.

Then, you must start to test for prime somewhere, the easies is to start at previous + 1. The first prime is 2, so when creating the class set the last known number (n) to 1;

In the next() method you would have something like this:

do {
    n += 1;
} while (!isPrime(n));
return n;

The isPrime is a method which returns true if n is a prime and false otherwise. A good exercise to implement.

There are several optimizations if you'd like such as after 2 no primes can be even, so you only have to check every other number.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, sorry about not naming the class primesequence forgot to edit it. This is much easier than the algorithm that I came up with and implements the sequence much better, so let me work and try it out. Thanks a lot! –  user1069755 Nov 28 '11 at 19:55

This is easy. Google a list of primes. Create a List<Integer> that contains all the primes less than or equal to Integer.MAX_VALUE. Use the .iterator function to create an Iterator<Integer> which basically does what the Sequence should do.

Create a wrapper class that implements Sequence based on the Iterator<Integer>. Throw a RuntimeException when Iterator<Integer> runs out of primes.

share|improve this answer
    
That might be a wee bit memory hungry. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 28 '11 at 20:23
    
Just buy a computer that can hold a list of about pi(2^31)=(2^31) / ln(2^31) = 99,940,775 integers in memory. –  emory Nov 28 '11 at 20:43
    
105097565 to be precise. Yeah, the standard answer "Better algorithm? Just throw more hardware at it!" ;) I would recommend using int[] though, rather than a List<Integer>, before buying a new computer. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 28 '11 at 20:53

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