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I have a class that looks like this:

public class MyModel{

  public int TheId { get; set; }
  public int ....
  public string ....
}

I have another class that take a list of several types, including MyModel, and serializes the lists in json. It has several methods, one for each type of list.

public class ToJson{

  public string MyModelToJson (List<MyModel> TheListOfMyModel) {

      string ListOfMyModelInJson = "";

      JavascriptSerializer TheSerializer = new ....
      TheSerializer.RegisterConverters(....
      ListOfMyModelInJson = TheSerializer.Serialize(TheListOfMyModel);

      return ListOfMyModelInJson;
   }

   public string MyOtherModelToJson (List<MyOtherModel> TheListOfOtherModel) {....}

   public string YetAnotherModelToJson (List<YetAnotherModelToJson> TheListOfYetAnotherModelToJson) {....}

}

What I want to do is encapsulate the serializing into MyModel, something like this:

public class MyModel{

  public int TheId { get; set; }
  public int ....
  public string ....

  public string MyModelToJson()
}

How can I encapsulate a method into an object so that it's available for a list of objects?

I thought of doing a foreach loop but that gets messy because in the calling method, you have to manipulate the json strings of each object in the list and concatenate them.

Let me know of OO principles of encapsulation apply in this case.

Thanks for your suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at Json.NET? It can serialize collections within arbitrary object graphs pretty well. –  default.kramer Nov 28 '11 at 21:19
    
I'm looking to stick with the native .net serializer because I don't want to add a dependency. –  frenchie Nov 28 '11 at 21:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way would be to define your ToJson as accepting a generic type:

public class ToJson<T>{

  public string MyModelToJson (List<T> TheListOfMyModel) {

  string ListOfMyModelInJson = "";

  JavascriptSerializer TheSerializer = new ....
  TheSerializer.RegisterConverters(....

  ListOfMyModelInJson = TheSerializer.Serialize(TheListOfMyModel);
  return ListOfMyModelInJson;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would rewrite the ToJson class; I was wondering if there was a way to remove this class altogether. –  frenchie Nov 28 '11 at 20:10

For what it's worth, I wouldn't remove the class at all. What you're talking about doing is adding an additional responsibility to your model, and apparently going against SRP heuristic. That is, you have a class whose current responsibility is to model data, and you're going to make it responsible for modeling data and also converting its data to some form, using various service classes that it now needs to know about. If the model class encapsulates GUI concepts like raising events for GUI, then it has divergent reasons to change - if the scheme for notifying the GUI changes and if the scheme for converting to JSON changes.

If it were me, I'd have the models inherit from a base class or define an interface as mentioned by Matt Fenwick, and have your ToJson class take a batch of those as input, process them, and return the result.

I understand the desire to eliminate the extra class, and might advocate it if it were a simple conversion involving only data elements of the class, but as soon as you need a service class of some kind to do the operation, it seems a poor fit for the model object, as you now cannot model data without a JavascriptSerializer. That's awkward if you want to model data that you don't then serialize.

One final thing that I can think of is that you can build on a'b'c'd'e'f'g'h's suggestion and piggy back the method onto some existing service, thus eliminating the class. If you just have a generic method on that service that implements the serialization, you can eliminate the separate class, since you no longer need a separate method for each model object type.

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I'm not sure that I understand your question, but I think that what you want to do is not return a String but a JsonObject, JsonArray, or JsonPrimitive:

public class MyModel {

  public JsonObject myModelToJson() ... //this method implements the interface!
}

Where JsonObject is a class that represents a json object.

Make this class implement an interface where the contract is that the return value is a JsonValue.

Then, in the ToJson class, return a JsonArray:

public class ToJson

  public JsonArray myModelToJson(List<things that can be json-ized> myList) ...

}

Don't serialize the objects/arrays/primitives to a String until you absolutely need to, and let a library take care of the actual serialization.


That was a confusing answer.

Here's what I think you should do:

  • get hold of a decent json library. Ideally, it should have JsonObjects, JsonArrays, and JsonPrimitives which are subclasses of JsonElement. I've used Google gson in java, but I don't know what an equivalent C# version would be.
  • create an interface, JsonAble with one method -- toJson -- that returns a JsonElement.
  • implement this interface for all concerned classes
  • serializing a list of JsonAble objects is then very easy -- it becomes a JsonArray.
  • a decent json library should have a serialize method -- so you'll never have to worry about throwing strings around yourself
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I'm looking to stick with the native .net json serializer. –  frenchie Nov 28 '11 at 21:53

extension methods!

public static class JsonExtensions
{
  public static string ToJson<T>(this List<T> list)
  {
  }
}
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