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I'm working on a very simple email-like messaging functionality as part of an App Engine application. It is simpler than email in that there are no "subject lines". In other words, two users (or more, but not hundreds) can just exchange messages in a conversation thread that contains all of their back-and-forth messages (like IM, but with a thread that persists between sessions). So far, I'm thinking of modeling this with two types of entities: Message and Conversation

class Message(db.Model):
    sender = StringProperty(required=True)
    receiver = StringProperty(required=True)
    message = TextProperty(required=True)
    timestamp = DateTimeProperty(auto_now_add=True)

class Conversation(db.Model):
    messages = ListProperty(int) # List holding the datastore-assigned integer ids of the messages in this conversation
    users = StringListProperty()

Since creating a Message requires the creation or modification of a Conversation, I would like to store Message and Conversation in the same entity group so that those changes can occur in a transaction. I figured that I would have the Message entities as children of their associated Conversation entities.

The Message needs the key for the Conversation entity to specify it as a parent. The Conversation needs the id of the Message to store it in the messages property.

What is the most efficient way to do this?

  • If I have the datastore assign an id for the Conversation entity, then I need to (1) put the Conversation entity into the datastore to get its id, (2) put the Message entity into the datastore to get its id, and (3) update the Conversation entity to add the new message id and put it again into the datastore. This requires 3 trips to the datastore, which looks inefficient.
  • I could also create a unique key name for the Conversation entity (e.g., ';'.join(sorted(conv.users)). By doing this, I could avoid one of the three trips to the datastore outlined above.

Is there a way to do this with a single trip to the datastore? Am I worrying about a marginal amount of efficiency, which I should really not worry about? Is there a smarter design pattern for what I'm looking to do? If so, I would really appreciate a pointer.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're inverting the conventional design pattern, which would be this:

class Conversation(db.Model):
    users = StringListProperty()

class Message(db.Model):
    sender = StringProperty(required=True)
    receiver = StringProperty(required=True)
    message = TextProperty(required=True)
    timestamp = DateTimeProperty(auto_now_add=True)
    conversation = db.ReferenceProperty(Conversation)

In the model above, you don't need to modify the conversation entity when you store a new message, unless you're updating the user list. I would recommend using this unless there's a reason not to.

This should also be a bit more scalable. If your conversation reaches 1000 messages, you don't have to store 1000 message ID properties on a single conversation entity.

Let's assume, though, that you want to keep your original model. To store the conversation and message in a single trip, you'd need to eager-assign the message ID. My advice here would be to generate a UUID (e.g. with uuid.uuid4()) and assign this as the message key name (and append it to the messages list), rather than waiting for the datastore to assign an ID.

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Thanks for the response. The reason for storing the list of messages in the Conversation entity is avoiding a query for retrieving the messages in a conversation (more frequent than adding a message to the conversation). This way, when I need to display the messages in a specific conversation, I just get their ids from the messages property and grab them from the datastore without having to execute a query. I understand that the time it takes to execute the query is significantly longer than the time it takes to get by id. Please help me understand if I'm not thinking about this properly. –  cv12 Nov 28 '11 at 21:01
    
I think the reason key queries are fast is because there is always a single index used for them. Since you'll have an index on your Message.conversation property I would expect that query to be just as fast. –  arkanciscan Nov 28 '11 at 21:37
    
If you can envision there being hundreds or more messages in a conversation, I would strongly recommend that you use an index. It gives you a much more flexible range of query capabilities. Let's say you only want to fetch the last 24 hours worth of messages from a conversation. With an index, this is easy. With an ID list, it's impossible. It's also fewer RPCs. If you know the conversation ID, you can run one query to pull back the associated messages, instead of one RPC to get the conversation and another to get a batch of messages. –  Drew Sears Nov 28 '11 at 21:53
    
Test it for yourself, but I think you'll find the performance may be better with an index, especially at scale. Again, if you want 1000 messages, your model requires that you send a conversation ID, receive 1000 message IDs, send 1000 message IDs, receive 1000 messages. With a query you just send a conversation ID and receive 1000 messages. –  Drew Sears Nov 28 '11 at 21:55
    
Drew - Thanks so much. What you described makes a lot of sense. –  cv12 Nov 29 '11 at 17:01

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