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I've been reading about LINQ to Objects, and now my colleagues want me to present it to them.

Now, I have an OK understanding of the operators and the syntax choices, but I've heard you can avoid heavy nested loops by using LINQ. I'm having trouble coming up with a good set of "before and after" code listings to demonstrate this though.

I found a great example of sorting and grouping with and without LINQ in Magennis' book, and he also has an example of writing xml. But what about those nested loops? Is this even a realistic claim, given that we usually need a foreach loop or two to iterate over the results of the query anyway?

If anyone can explain this idea to me (ideally with specific examples), I would greatly appreciate it.

share|improve this question
    
Why the vote to close as "not constructive"? Seems like the question could have broad usefulness and allows for one or more concrete answers. –  Eric J. Nov 28 '11 at 20:32
2  
@Henk: He's asking for concrete examples. Perhaps the title could be improved to reflect that. –  Eric J. Nov 28 '11 at 20:32
1  
It seems like this question could easily draw the kind of answers that will improve the average developer's understanding of how LINQ can be put to good use. I say: Give it a try. We can still close it after a day or so. –  yas4891 Nov 28 '11 at 20:35
3  
@EricJ, yas4891, I disagree. SO is about "here is my problem, what is the solution." We can then identify the single best solution among arbitrarily many. This question is "create an arbitrary problem and then a solution where Linq is useful." This is not an effective SO question. We provide solutions to problems, not ideas for problems that then need a solution. This is a poll, not a question with a single best answer. –  Anthony Pegram Nov 28 '11 at 20:44
2  
@Anthony: His wording is a little loose, but at the core he's asking "how can I use Linq to avoid heavily nested loops." Seems specific enough to allow for specific, useful answers... which he got. –  Eric J. Nov 28 '11 at 20:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Say you've got a lot of products, such as:

var products = new List<Product>
    {
        new Product { Id = 1, Category = "Electronics", Value = 15.0 },
        // etc.
    };

And you want to find all products with a value > $100.0, grouped by category, you could do this using foreach:

var results = new Dictionary<string, List<Product>>();

foreach (var p in products)
{
    if (p.value > 100.0)
    {
        List<Product> productsByGroup;

        if (!results.TryGetValue(p.Category, out productsByGroup))
        {
            productsByGroup = new List<Product>();
            results.Add(p.Category, productsByGroup);
        }
        productsByGroup.Add(p);
    }
}

Or, you could simply use the LINQ methods:

var results = products.Where(prod => prod.Value > 100.0)
                  .GroupBy(prod => prod.Category);

Or using LINQ expression syntax:

var results = from p in products 
                  where p.Value > 100.0
                  group p by p.Category;

Much more concise and less error-prone.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, James. I set your as my accepted answer, as I think it looks very realistic and it is spot on what I was looking for. –  Skywise Nov 29 '11 at 20:14

Here's a type of nested loop you can remove with Linq.

foreach(SomeClass item in Items)
{
    foreach(SomeOtherClass subItem in item.SubItems)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

It can be turned into:

foreach(SomeOtherClass subItem in Items.SelectMany(i => i.SubItems))
{
}

Using the SelectMany extension method on IEnumerable.

One place where this is quite useful is for nested loop double-break scenarios.

share|improve this answer
var results = new List<Object>();
foreach(var i in list)
{
    if (i.property == value)
    {
         foreach(var j in list.SubList)
         {
              if (j.other == something)
              {
                  results.push(j);
              }
         }
    }
}

could be:

var results = list.Where(i => i == value)
                  .SelectMany(i => i.SubList)
                  .Where(j => j.other == something)
                  .ToList();
share|improve this answer

Here's a somewhat contrived example.

Suppose you were given a list of strings and your task was to find and return all the control characters found in those strings in a HashSet<>.

var listOStrings = new List<string> { ... };
var result = new HashSet<char>();

You might do something like this:

foreach (var str in listOStrings)
{
    foreach (var c in str)
    {
        if (Char.IsControl(c))
        {
            result.Add(c);
        }
    }
}

Or using LINQ:

result = new HashSet<char>(
    listOStrings
        .SelectMany(str => str.Where(Char.IsControl)));
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I see a lot of people use Linq like this, so maybe it's not that contrived after all. –  Eric J. Nov 28 '11 at 20:49

The most useful examples are when you can use the built in methods in LINQ, like All and Any. Like this:

bool hasCats = listOfAnimals.Any(animal => animal.Type == "Cat");

Write that with a for loop with if and break and a bool check variable, I guess that would be at least five lines of code to do the same. Hmm, lets see:

bool hasCats = false;
foreach(Animal animal in listOfAnimals)
{
    if (animal.Type == "Cat")
    {
        hasCats = true;
        break;
    }
}

ooops, 9 lines. And you need to read at least three carefully of them to know what the code does.

Well, more of the same. Assuming the mammals have a real type hierarchy.

IEnumerable<Cat> allCats = listOfAnimals.OfType<Cat>();

This returns all animals that can be casted into a Cat and returns them, casted and ready to use. Written with loops:

List<Cat> allCats = new List<Cat>();
foreach(var animal in listOfAnimals)
{
    var cat = animal as Cat;
    if (cat != null)
    {
        allCats.Add(cat);
    }
}

To be honest you should break that out to a separate method and use yield return cat; to get the same lazy behaviour as the LINQ version.

But I prefer the query syntax. It is nice and fluent to read with very little noice.

var cats = 
    from cat in listOfCats
    where cat.Age > 5
    where cat.Color == "White"
    select cat;

Written with plain loops

List<Cat> cats = new List<Cat>();
foreach(Cat cat in listOfCats)
{
    if (cat.Age > 5)
    {
        if (cat.Color == "White")
        {
            cats.Add(cat);
        }
    }
}

again a separate method with yield return would be required to get the same lazy evaluation behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Albin. Your answer is missing the "before" part, which is what I asked for initially. –  Skywise Nov 29 '11 at 7:22
    
@Skywise, I thought the before parts would be trivial to write, but I added them. –  Albin Sunnanbo Nov 29 '11 at 8:27

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