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My gdb backtrace gives:

(gdb) backtrace
#0  0x00000000 in ?? ()
#1  0x0804a211 in init () at example1.cpp:147
#2  0x0804a6bc in main (argc=1, argv=0xbffff3d4) at example1.cpp:283

Not very informative. Eclipse debugger at least lets me see that it stops on line 3 below:

// Create a vertex array object
GLuint vao;
glGenVertexArrays( 1, &vao );
glBindVertexArray( vao );

This is a very common block to see in gl programming, and I'm even running other code with the same block with no problem. So I'm baffled.

Build output from running make:

g++ -g -DFREEGLUT_STATIC -DGLEW_STATIC -I../../include example1.cpp ../../Commo/InitShader.o  -L/usr/lib/mesa -lGLEW -lglut -lGL -lX11  -lm  -o example1

Program containing the problem:

// rotating cube with two texture objects
// change textures with 1 and 2 keys

#include "Angel.h"

const int  NumTriangles = 12; // (6 faces)(2 triangles/face)
const int  NumVertices  = 3 * NumTriangles;
const int  TextureSize  = 64;

typedef Angel::vec4 point4;
typedef Angel::vec4 color4;

// Texture objects and storage for texture image
GLuint textures[2];

GLubyte image[TextureSize][TextureSize][3];
GLubyte image2[TextureSize][TextureSize][3];

// Vertex data arrays
point4  points[NumVertices];
color4  quad_colors[NumVertices];
vec2    tex_coords[NumVertices];

// Array of rotation angles (in degrees) for each coordinate axis
enum { Xaxis = 0, Yaxis = 1, Zaxis = 2, NumAxes = 3 };
int      Axis = Xaxis;
GLfloat  Theta[NumAxes] = { 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };
GLuint   theta;

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
int Index = 0;
void quad( int a, int b, int c, int d )
{
    point4 vertices[8] = {
        point4( -0.5, -0.5,  0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4( -0.5,  0.5,  0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4(  0.5,  0.5,  0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4(  0.5, -0.5,  0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4( -0.5, -0.5, -0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4( -0.5,  0.5, -0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4(  0.5,  0.5, -0.5, 1.0 ),
        point4(  0.5, -0.5, -0.5, 1.0 )
    };

    color4 colors[8] = {
        color4( 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0 ),  // black
        color4( 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0 ),  // red
        color4( 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0 ),  // yellow
        color4( 0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0 ),  // green
        color4( 0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0 ),  // blue
        color4( 1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0 ),  // magenta
        color4( 0.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0 ),  // white
        color4( 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0 )   // cyan
    };

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[a];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 0.0, 0.0 );
    Index++;

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[b];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 0.0, 1.0 );
    Index++;

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[c];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 1.0, 1.0 );
    Index++;

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[a];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 0.0, 0.0 );
    Index++;

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[c];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 1.0, 1.0 );
    Index++;

    quad_colors[Index] = colors[a];
    points[Index] = vertices[d];
    tex_coords[Index] = vec2( 1.0, 0.0 );
    Index++;
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void colorcube()
{
    quad( 1, 0, 3, 2 );
    quad( 2, 3, 7, 6 );
    quad( 3, 0, 4, 7 );
    quad( 6, 5, 1, 2 );
    quad( 4, 5, 6, 7 );
    quad( 5, 4, 0, 1 );
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void init()
{
    colorcube();

    // Create a checkerboard pattern
    for ( int i = 0; i < 64; i++ ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j < 64; j++ ) {
            GLubyte c = (((i & 0x8) == 0) ^ ((j & 0x8)  == 0)) * 255;
            image[i][j][0]  = c;
            image[i][j][1]  = c;
            image[i][j][2]  = c;
            image2[i][j][0] = c;
            image2[i][j][1] = 0;
            image2[i][j][2] = c;
        }
    }

    // Initialize texture objects
    glGenTextures( 2, textures );

    glBindTexture( GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0] );
    glTexImage2D( GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGB, TextureSize, TextureSize, 0,
        GL_RGB, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, image );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_REPEAT );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_REPEAT );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST );

    glBindTexture( GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[1] );
    glTexImage2D( GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGB, TextureSize, TextureSize, 0,
        GL_RGB, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, image2 );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_REPEAT );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_REPEAT );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST );
    glTexParameterf( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST );

    glActiveTexture( GL_TEXTURE0 );
    glBindTexture( GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0] );

    // Create a vertex array object
    GLuint vao;
    glGenVertexArrays( 1, &vao );
    glBindVertexArray( vao );

    // Create and initialize a buffer object
    GLuint buffer;
    glGenBuffers( 1, &buffer );
    glBindBuffer( GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, buffer );
    glBufferData( GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,
        sizeof(points) + sizeof(quad_colors) + sizeof(tex_coords),
        NULL, GL_STATIC_DRAW );

    // Specify an offset to keep track of where we're placing data in our
    //   vertex array buffer.  We'll use the same technique when we
    //   associate the offsets with vertex attribute pointers.
    GLintptr offset = 0;
    glBufferSubData( GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, offset, sizeof(points), points );
    offset += sizeof(points);

    glBufferSubData( GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, offset,
        sizeof(quad_colors), quad_colors );
    offset += sizeof(quad_colors);

    glBufferSubData( GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, offset, sizeof(tex_coords), tex_coords );

    // Load shaders and use the resulting shader program
    GLuint program = InitShader( "vshader71.glsl", "fshader71.glsl" );
    glUseProgram( program );

    // set up vertex arrays
    offset = 0;
    GLuint vPosition = glGetAttribLocation( program, "vPosition" );
    glEnableVertexAttribArray( vPosition );
    glVertexAttribPointer( vPosition, 4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0,
        BUFFER_OFFSET(offset) );
    offset += sizeof(points);

    GLuint vColor = glGetAttribLocation( program, "vColor" ); 
    glEnableVertexAttribArray( vColor );
    glVertexAttribPointer( vColor, 4, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0,
        BUFFER_OFFSET(offset) );
    offset += sizeof(quad_colors);

    GLuint vTexCoord = glGetAttribLocation( program, "vTexCoord" );
    glEnableVertexAttribArray( vTexCoord );
    glVertexAttribPointer( vTexCoord, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0,
        BUFFER_OFFSET(offset) );

    // Set the value of the fragment shader texture sampler variable
    //   ("texture") to the the appropriate texture unit. In this case,
    //   zero, for GL_TEXTURE0 which was previously set by calling
    //   glActiveTexture().
    glUniform1i( glGetUniformLocation(program, "texture"), 0 );

    theta = glGetUniformLocation( program, "theta" );

    glEnable( GL_DEPTH_TEST );

    glClearColor( 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0 );
}

void display( void )
{
    glClear( GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT );

    glUniform3fv( theta, 1, Theta );

    glDrawArrays( GL_TRIANGLES, 0, NumVertices );

    glutSwapBuffers();
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void mouse( int button, int state, int x, int y )
{
    if ( state == GLUT_DOWN ) {
        switch( button ) {
        case GLUT_LEFT_BUTTON:    Axis = Xaxis;  break;
        case GLUT_MIDDLE_BUTTON:  Axis = Yaxis;  break;
        case GLUT_RIGHT_BUTTON:   Axis = Zaxis;  break;
        }
    }
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void idle( void )
{
    Theta[Axis] += 0.01;

    if ( Theta[Axis] > 360.0 ) {
        Theta[Axis] -= 360.0;
    }

    glutPostRedisplay();
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void keyboard( unsigned char key, int mousex, int mousey )
{
    switch( key ) {
    case 033: // Escape Key
    case 'q': case 'Q':
        exit( EXIT_SUCCESS );
        break;
    case '1':
        glBindTexture( GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0] );
        break;

    case '2':
        glBindTexture( GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[1] );
        break;
    }

    glutPostRedisplay();
}

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    glutInit( &argc, argv );
    glutInitDisplayMode( GLUT_RGBA | GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_DEPTH );
    glutInitWindowSize( 512, 512 );
    glutInitContextVersion( 3, 2 );
    glutInitContextProfile( GLUT_CORE_PROFILE );
    glutCreateWindow( "Color Cube" );

    glewInit();

    init();

    glutDisplayFunc( display );
    glutKeyboardFunc( keyboard );
    glutMouseFunc( mouse );
    glutIdleFunc( idle );

    glutMainLoop();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Does the third line happen to be line 147 of example1.cpp? –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 28 '11 at 21:34
4  
Sorry; this isn't enough information to even begin working on this problem. How do you load your OpenGL function pointers? Do you use a library or do you do it manually? If it's a library, did you initialize it? What library is it? If you do it manually, what pointer value did you get back for glGenVertexArrays? –  Nicol Bolas Nov 28 '11 at 21:37
1  
Post a complete, minimal program that demonstrates the problem. –  genpfault Nov 28 '11 at 21:47
2  
@bbarre: That doesn't change the fact that it's still not enough information to go on. At the very least, you could link to the example. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 28 '11 at 21:48
1  
@genpfault The output: OpenGL vendor string: NVIDIA Corporation OpenGL renderer string: GeForce GT 240/PCI/SSE2 OpenGL version string: 3.3.0 NVIDIA 275.28 OpenGL shading language version string: 3.30 NVIDIA via Cg compiler OpenGL extensions: –  Rooster Nov 28 '11 at 21:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 67 down vote accepted
glewExperimental = GL_TRUE; 
glewInit();

Should do the magic


Experimental Drivers

GLEW obtains information on the supported extensions from the graphics driver. Experimental or pre-release drivers, however, might not report every available extension through the standard mechanism, in which case GLEW will report it unsupported. To circumvent this situation, the glewExperimental global switch can be turned on by setting it to GL_TRUE before calling glewInit(), which ensures that all extensions with valid entry points will be exposed.

share|improve this answer
2  
Dude! You rock! It works. And thanks as well to you others who were working with me. –  Rooster Nov 28 '11 at 22:38
    
Well, I had the same problem some weeks ago :) –  KoKuToru Nov 28 '11 at 22:39
    
I thank you very much for this, I'll look into the reason this fix works but right I'm just glad I solved my problem ! –  lollancf37 Apr 21 '12 at 4:23
2  
No it's not. Had exactly the same problem under Linux 64-bit and glewExperimental = GL_TRUE solved it. –  Plankalkül Mar 2 '13 at 18:44
2  
No it's not. Had exactly the same problem under Windows 7 64-bit and glewExperimental = GL_TRUE solved it. –  Korchkidu Jan 14 '14 at 11:51

Works fine for me:

screenshot

GL_VERSION  : 4.1.10750 Compatibility Profile Context
GL_VENDOR   : ATI Technologies Inc.
GL_RENDERER : AMD Radeon HD 6500 Series

EDIT: I'm using the latest versions of FreeGLUT (2.8.0 RC2) and GLEW (1.7.0), which may make a difference if you're relying on distro-supplied versions.

share|improve this answer

Have you tried testing on other systems with different graphics cards? If your code meets the OpenGL spec and it mysteriously crashes inside a function that is correctly called with valid parameters, it could well be a driver bug. If it's a driver bug, you're reduced to guesswork, making shotgun changes, and gradually building up a healthy exasperation that a huge corporation with billions of dollars produce absolutely crap excuses for a graphics card driver. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't. But is it even worth trying since I can call the same function just fine in a different program on this same machine? –  Rooster Nov 28 '11 at 22:18
    
Yes, it's definitely worth testing, because driver bugs can be totally nonsensical and random. Trust me, I've spent many an hour bashing my head on my desk over OpenGL driver bugs. The standard of drivers is terrible, even nVidia and ATI, and don't get me started on Intel. –  AshleysBrain Nov 28 '11 at 22:20
    
Wow. Well so far OpenGL programming has been....fun. And I mean that in the most sarcastic way possible. –  Rooster Nov 28 '11 at 22:23
2  
OpenGL is great, but only after you get it working :P –  AshleysBrain Nov 28 '11 at 22:24

Ubuntu 10.04 for example comes with glew 1.50 which glGenVertexArrays doesnt work without the glewExperimental flag. so it is glew version dependent

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