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I'm working with some tools, and the only way it can determine if a particular transaction is successful is if it passes various checks. However, it is limited in the way that it can only do one check at a time, and it must be sequential. Everything must be computed from left to right.

For example,

A || C && D

It will be computed with A || C first, and then the result will be AND'ed with D.

It gets tougher with parenthesis. I am unable to compute an expression like this, since B || C would need to be compututed first. I cannot work with any order of operations;

A && ( B || C)

I think I've worked this down to this sequential boolean expression,

C || B && A

Where C || B is computed first, then that result is AND'd with A

Can all boolean expressions be successfully worked into a sequential boolean expression? (Like the example I have)

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Define "sequential". Why is A && (B || C) not "sequential"? –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 28 '11 at 22:17
    
B || C is computed first. I am unable to work with any Order of Ops –  user906153 Nov 28 '11 at 22:18
    
All you need for your example is C || B && A Not A && C || B && A. –  Paulpro Nov 28 '11 at 22:20
    
You're right, I'll change it –  user906153 Nov 28 '11 at 22:24
    
Are you able to store the results of previous operations anywhere? It might help to give some detail about what specific limitations you are facing. I'm not sure whether something like "(A and B) or (C and D)" is possible without storing the intermediate results. –  GargantuChet Nov 28 '11 at 22:32
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer is no:

Consider A || B && C || D which has the truth table:

A | B | C | D |
0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0
0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0
0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1
0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1
0 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1
1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0
1 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1
1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1
1 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1
1 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0
1 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1
1 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1
1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1

If it were possible to evaluate sequentially there would have to be a last expression which would be one of two cases:

Case 1:

X || Y such that Y is one of A,B,C,D and X is any sequential boolean expression.

Now, since there is no variable in A,B,C,D where the entire expression is true whenever that variable is true, none of:

X || A
X || B
X || C
X || D

can possibly be the last operation in the expression (for any X).

Case 2:

X && Y: such that Y is one of A,B,C,D and X is any sequential boolean expression.

Now, since there is no variable in A,B,C,D where the entire expression is false whenever that variable is false, none of:

X && A
X && B
X && C
X && D

can possibly be the last operation in the expression (for any X).

Therefore you cannot write (A || B) && (C || D) in this way.


The reason you are able to do this for some expressions, like: A && ( B || C) becoming C || B && A is because that expression can be built recursively out of expressions which have one of the two properties above:

IE.

The truth table for A && ( B || C) is:

A | B | C |
0 | 0 | 0 | 0
0 | 0 | 1 | 0
0 | 1 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1 | 0
1 | 0 | 0 | 0
1 | 0 | 1 | 1
1 | 1 | 0 | 1
1 | 1 | 1 | 1

Which we can quickly see has the property that it is false whenever A is 0. So Our expression Could be X && A.

Then we take A out of the truth table and look at only the rows where A is 1 is the original:

B | C
0 | 0 | 0
0 | 1 | 1
1 | 0 | 1
1 | 1 | 1

Which has the property that it is True whenever B is 1 (or C, we can pick here). So we can write the expression as

X || B and the entire expression becomes X || B && A

Then we reduce the table again to the portion where B was 0 and we get:

C
0 | 0
1 | 1

X is just C. So the final expression is C || B && A

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+1 for a beautiful proof! –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 28 '11 at 22:48
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Can't you just do this:

(( A || C ) && D)

and for your second example:

((( A && C ) || B ) && A )

Would that work for you?

Hope that helps...

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You'll hit problems if you need to do something like (A || B) && (C || D) unless you can store the intermediate values for later use.

If you're allowed to construct more than one chain and try them all until either one of them passes or they all fail (so each chain is effectively ORed with the next) then I should think you can handle any combination. The example above would become (where each line is a separate query):

(A && C) ||
(A && D) ||
(B && C) ||
(B && D)

However, for a very complex check this could easily get out of hand!

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This is a problem of rewriting an expression so that no parentheses occur on the right. Logical AND (∧) and OR (∨) are both commutative:

  • A ∧ B = B ∧ A
  • A ∨ B = B ∨ A

So you can rewrite any expression of the form “X a (Y)” as “(Y) a X”:

  • A ∧ (B ∧ C) = (A ∧ B) ∧ C
  • A ∧ (B ∨ C) = (B ∨ C) ∧ A
  • A ∨ (B ∧ C) = (B ∧ C) ∨ A
  • A ∨ (B ∨ C) = (B ∨ C) ∨ A

They are also distributive, by the following laws:

  • (A ∧ B) ∨ (A ∧ C)
    = A ∧ (B ∨ C)
    = (B ∨ C) ∧ A
  • (A ∨ B) ∧ (A ∨ C)
    = A ∨ (B ∧ C)
    = (B ∧ C) ∨ A

So many Boolean expressions can be rewritten without parentheses on the right. But, as a counter­example, there is no way to rewrite an expression such as (A ∧ B) ∨ (C ∧ D) if A ≠ C, because of the lack of common factors.

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