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I'm using the singleton pattern in several places in an application, and I'm getting memory leak errors from clang when analyzing the code.

static MyClass *_sharedMyClass;
+ (MyClass *)sharedMyClass {
  @synchronized(self) {
    if (_sharedMyClass == nil)
      [[self alloc] init];
  }
  return _sharedMyClass;
}

// clang error: Object allocated on line 5 is no longer referenced after this point and has a retain count of +1 (object leaked)

I'm using these settings for scan-build:

scan-build -v -v -v -V -k xcodebuild

I'm fairly certain that the code in the singleton is just fine - after all, it's the same code referenced here on Stack Overflow as well as in Apple's documentation - but I would like to get the memory leak warning sorted out so my scan-build returns success.

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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I may be being exceptionally dense, but surely your line 5

[[self alloc] init];

allocates an object of the containing class type, and promptly throws it away? Do you not want

_sharedMyClass = [[self alloc] init];

?

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Actually the -init method sets the static _sharedMyClass variable, so this is fine. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/145154/… –  pix0r May 6 '09 at 16:24
2  
Then I would guess that CLANG isn't smart enough to infer that the [self alloc] return is actually setting the self parameter, which will be saved by the init method. It thus thinks it's just lost (as I did, without more context). –  Adam Wright May 6 '09 at 16:26
    
LOL, you are correct. Thanks. –  pix0r May 6 '09 at 18:10
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Apple has since updated their recommended singleton code to pass the static analyzer:

+ (MyGizmoClass*)sharedManager
{
    if (sharedGizmoManager == nil) {
        sharedGizmoManager = [[super allocWithZone:NULL] init];
    }
    return sharedGizmoManager;
}

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    return [[self sharedManager] retain];
}

Now +sharedManager calls super's -allocWithZone: and assigns the return of -init, and the singleton's -allocWithZone: just returns a retained sharedInstance.

Edit:

Why the retain in +allocWithZone:?

+allocWithZone: is overridden because someone using MyGizmoClass could circumvent the singleton by calling [[MyGizmoClass alloc] init] instead of [MyGizmoClass sharedManager]. It's retained because +alloc is expected to always return an object with a retain count of +1.

Every call to +alloc should be balanced with a -release or -autorelease, so without the retain in +allocWithZone:, the shared instance could potentially be deallocated out from under other users.

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I like this approach but I don't understand the need for the retain in allocWithZone. Can somebody explain it to me? –  n8gray Dec 14 '10 at 22:41
    
Answered with an edit to my original answer. –  Justin Anderson Dec 16 '10 at 3:41
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You may be interested in a simple, one-method, GCD-based singleton implementation (and thus 10.6+ only) posted on Mike Ash's site:

+ (id)sharedFoo
{
    static dispatch_once_t pred;
    static Foo *foo = nil;

    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{ foo = [[self alloc] init]; });
    return foo;
}
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Thanks, looks nice.. Unfortunately I'm actually on the iPhone platform so that's not an option yet. –  pix0r Nov 13 '09 at 23:24
2  
GCD is available in iOS 4, so have at it. dispatch_once is definitely the way to go for singletons. –  Bill Garrison Mar 14 '11 at 0:34
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You are referencing self in a class method! Big no-no! Secondly, you are calling [[self alloc] init] and just throwing away the instance. You should assign the singleton reference in the class method, and not in init like I am guessing you are doing. Next, there is no real guarantee that _sharedMyClass will be initialized to zero. You should explicitly initialize it to nil.

static MyClass *_sharedMyClass = nil;

+ (MyClass *)sharedMyClass {
  @synchronized(self) {
    if (_sharedMyClass == nil)
      _sharedMyClass = [[MyClass alloc] init];
  }
  return _sharedMyClass;
}
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You also probably had this in there too...

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    @synchronized(self) {
        if (sharedInstance == nil) {
            sharedInstance = [super allocWithZone:zone];
            return sharedInstance;  // assignment and return on first allocation
        }
    }
    return nil; // on subsequent allocation attempts return nil
}

The reason you weren't storing it in init is because you were storing it in the method that alloc called. This is the pattern Apple has in their examples. If you save the value in your init as well, all is fine and the warning goes away. I'd leave the allocWithZone implementation alone.

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