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I would like to perform the following operations:

TRUNCATE TABLE Table1;
TRUNCATE TABLE Table2;

-- I do not want to allow possibly the viewing and definitely the modification 
-- of Table1 or Table2 at this point, so that I can make changes to them atomically
-- possibly even regardless of the isolation level in other sessions (or this one).

-- So, I lock both tables. I want to remove any data that could have made its way into
-- the tables, due to the current isolation level, for example, and remove any rows.
-- Also, from this point on, I want the tables to be unviewable (all queries blocked)
-- and unmodifyable (all INSERTs, UPDATEs, DELETEs blocked)
DELETE FROM Table1 WITH(TABLOCKX, HOLDLOCK);
DELETE FROM Table2 WITH(TABLOCKX, HOLDLOCK);

-- This is a long running complex INSERT operation into Table1
INSERT INTO Table1... SELECT ... 

-- This is a long running complex INSERT operation into Table2, based on the 
-- data in Table1 and some other ancillary tables
INSERT INTO Table2... SELECT ... FROM Table1... 

COMMIT;

I want to block all access to both tables Table1 and Table2 from the point that the TRUNCATE commands are complete to the point that they are completely constructed and the changes committed with the COMMIT. Preferably, even from clients using READ_UNCOMMITTED isolation level and even those performing NOLOCK queries, if this is possible.

Any advice would be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use partition switching. Despite the common belief, partition switching does not require your table to be partitioned. Prepare the new data in a staging table(s), the quickly switch them in and replace the old data:

create table users (
    id int identity(1,1) primary key, 
    name char(100));
go

insert into users (name) 
    values ('A'), ('B'), ('C'), ('D');
go

select * from users;

create table staging (
    id int identity(1,1) primary key, 
    name char(100));
create table staging_empty (
    id int identity(1,1) primary key, 
    name char(100));
go

insert into staging (name) 
    values ('Z'), ('Y'), ('X');
go

begin transaction;
alter table users switch partition 1 to staging_empty;
alter table staging switch partition 1 to users;
commit
go

select * from users;
go

See Transferring Data Efficiently by Using Partition Switching.

share|improve this answer
    
very cool, hadn't heard of partition switching before. –  BlackICE Nov 29 '11 at 1:12
    
This is very interesting, but it doesn't solve my problem (i.e., I have the potential for data loss, well not loss but mistransfer). I want writers and readers to be blocked, not to succeed into/from another data store (i.e., table). –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 29 '11 at 1:24
    
The readers and writers both are blocked. ALTER TABLE requires a SCH-M lock, which will conflict with everybody else, including dirty reads. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186396.aspx. The entire switch-out and switch-in is atomic due to the wrapping transaction. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 29 '11 at 1:26
    
Yes, but the statement: alter table users switch partition 1 to staging_empty; -- Will move all rows in users to staging_empty, you did not prevent writers from writing rows to users, while preparing staging. The point is that readers and writers to users, should have been blocked while staging was being prepared. –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 29 '11 at 1:57
    
But in your example you start by truncating the table, so the staging preparation cannot possible depend on the content of the table(s). Is the data to be inserted depended or not on the previous content of the table? –  Remus Rusanu Nov 29 '11 at 2:08

Use a BEGIN TRANSACTION. AFAIK you cannot block clients using READ_UNCOMMITTED or NO_LOCK, unless you are willing to put the database in single user mode. With the transaction, I don't think you need the DELETE... statements

I don't have SQLEM in front of me, so this may not be perfect:

BEGIN TRANSACTION

TRUNCATE TABLE Table1;
TRUNCATE TABLE Table2;

ALTER DATABASE [Works] SET MULTI_USER WITH NO_WAIT

-- This is a long running complex INSERT operation into Table1
INSERT INTO Table1... SELECT ... 

-- This is a long running complex INSERT operation into Table2, based on the 
-- data in Table1
INSERT INTO Table2... SELECT ... FROM Table1... 

ALTER DATABASE [Works] SET MULTI_USER WITH NO_WAIT

COMMIT;
share|improve this answer
    
What's the point of setting MULTI_USER twice? Also, I don't want to set the whole DB to single user mode to update 2 tables. –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 30 '11 at 4:05
    
sorry, looks like I pasted wrong, the first one was supposed to set single user. @Remus's answer is the way to go. –  BlackICE Dec 2 '11 at 1:12

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